Nancy Kugel's Profile

About

Bogusologists have recently discovered the ancient land of Iscondia and the evidence has proven the existence of several distinct Iscondic tribes. Each tribe was recognized for their amazing creativity and craftsmanship. Relying on the materials that were available locally, each tribe developed their own unique style which utilized those most abundant materials.

Iscondic Tribes™ is proud to present our series of products which are based on the recent bogusological discoveries at Iscondia. The tribe profiles below offer a small peek into their lifestyle.
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Repurposed items from The Gjenbruk Tribe
(YEN’-brook) – The ruins of the grand Gjenbruk civilization were located on the western-most portion of Iscondia. Archeologists have been able to determine that this tribe took advantage of the abundance of materi…

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  • Female
  • Born on November 6
  • Joined February 5, 2012

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Anything that can be given a second life

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About

Bogusologists have recently discovered the ancient land of Iscondia and the evidence has proven the existence of several distinct Iscondic tribes. Each tribe was recognized for their amazing creativity and craftsmanship. Relying on the materials that were available locally, each tribe developed their own unique style which utilized those most abundant materials.

Iscondic Tribes™ is proud to present our series of products which are based on the recent bogusological discoveries at Iscondia. The tribe profiles below offer a small peek into their lifestyle.
___~~~___________________
Repurposed items from The Gjenbruk Tribe
(YEN’-brook) – The ruins of the grand Gjenbruk civilization were located on the western-most portion of Iscondia. Archeologists have been able to determine that this tribe took advantage of the abundance of materials which had been used and cast off by other tribes. Finding that these items were in perfect condition and only the original use had fallen out of favour, the tribe re-imagined the items for new purposes while adding their own signature style to each piece. As the new purposes of these items become oldfangled, the Gjenbruk felt that it was the responsibility of the items new owner to repurpose the item for yet another use.
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Good Juju Talismans from The Hajmali Tribe
(High-ma-LEE’) – Anthropologists have identified the Hajmali as a tribe of mystics, shamen, or witch doctors. Other Iscondic sects would look to the Hajmali to create and imbue the various talismans, charms, and juju amulets they believed would help to deliver them through life’s trails with the good juju from their quixotic deities.
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Body Baubles from The Kauneus Tribe
(COW’-nee-oos) – This tribe was defined by its creation of distinctive body adornments. Archeologists have found amazing specimens of a variety of decorative pieces ranging from neckwear, earbobs… and other frippery
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Tchotchkes from The Gewgaw Tribe
(GYEW'-gaw) – The Gewgaws were renowned for their eclectic and decoratively embellished household items. Anthropologists believe that since the items identified so far appear to have no functional purpose, the items were collected by the elite of each tribe as a sign of status.
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Food from The Kulinaarinen Tribe
(koo-lee-NAR'-i-nen) – This tribe became the go-to people for inter-tribal get togethers. Known for their culinary prowess, they were also very inventive and skilled in the creation of delectable fare.
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Culinary tools from The Upishi Tribe
(OO'-pee-shee) – Anthropologists suggest the geographic vicinity to each other resulted in a seemingly symbiotic relationship between the Kulinaarinen and Upishi tribes. Where the former excelled gastronomically, the Upishi were masters of practical yet stylish kitchen tools and tableware.
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Garden trinkets from the Puutarha Tribe
(POO'-tar-ha) – The tradition of including statuary and art in the garden or within the grounds of your home can be traced back to the Puutarha Tribe. Many cultures since have interpreted this tradition in their own way. Many came to believe the trinkets held certain mythical or religious powers. The concept being that the mere inclusion of these pieces within their landscape would ward off bad spirits and protect the home from evil. However, the Puutarha simply liked the way they looked nestled among their prized plants.

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