KeystoneArtAndCraft's Profile

About

Keystone Art & Craft is named for Keystone House, the 1914 Seattle bungalow my husband and I purchased from his parents. As with any old house, it is a challenge and a joy to live in and maintain, and I find myself drawing inspiration from it at every turn.

** About Me **
I'm a twenty-something professional in the field of historic preservation, and I make stuff. You can find me on Ravelry, Tumblr, Flickr, and Facebook as "janeofall" -- that's short for Jane of All Trades.

** About Indigo Dying **
My favorite dye is by far indigo, for the stunning range of natural blues it produces -- I even dyed the yardage for my wedding dress with indigo! Think about your favorite blue jeans and that perfect clear evening and the textured velvet of windy seas on sunny days -- those are all colors found from the…

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  • Female
  • Joined August 6, 2010

Favorite materials

silk, wool, cotton, linen, used denim, recycled fibers, indigo, natural dyes, natural colors, upcycled materials, merino, cashmere, alpaca

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About

Keystone Art & Craft is named for Keystone House, the 1914 Seattle bungalow my husband and I purchased from his parents. As with any old house, it is a challenge and a joy to live in and maintain, and I find myself drawing inspiration from it at every turn.

** About Me **
I'm a twenty-something professional in the field of historic preservation, and I make stuff. You can find me on Ravelry, Tumblr, Flickr, and Facebook as "janeofall" -- that's short for Jane of All Trades.

** About Indigo Dying **
My favorite dye is by far indigo, for the stunning range of natural blues it produces -- I even dyed the yardage for my wedding dress with indigo! Think about your favorite blue jeans and that perfect clear evening and the textured velvet of windy seas on sunny days -- those are all colors found from the indigo vat.

Indigo dyeing is like no other dye, natural or synthetic. Used for thousands of years by many different cultures, indigo can only be dissolved in water that lacks oxygen. Dye vats were traditionally reduced using urine; I use a chemical reduction process that avoids the pee and produces brilliant, colorfast blues.

I buy my indigo from Earthues Natural Color Company in the Old Ballard neighborhood of Seattle, an excellent resource for dyes, supplies, and classes. There are several excellent books on indigo dying, both how-to and history-of; just search for "indigo" in your library or online bookseller and take your pick!

Learn more on my Facebook at www.facebook.com/KeystoneArtAndCraft/

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