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Barbara Wesson-Garrison's Profile

About


My work is influenced by my deep love
and connection to the natural world.

As a young child in Western Canada
I remember long trips in the Canadian Rockies
with my Grandmother
who shared her love of nature
and native art.

She was a dedicated gardener
and I had a huge sand box to play in.

It was the most natural thing to be touching the earth,
to be a part of it.

When my family emigrated to Southern California
we lived for several years in a small artist community/ college town
where I was surrounded by incredibly creative people.
Paul Soldner, one of…

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  • Joined March 31, 2008

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About


My work is influenced by my deep love
and connection to the natural world.

As a young child in Western Canada
I remember long trips in the Canadian Rockies
with my Grandmother
who shared her love of nature
and native art.

She was a dedicated gardener
and I had a huge sand box to play in.

It was the most natural thing to be touching the earth,
to be a part of it.

When my family emigrated to Southern California
we lived for several years in a small artist community/ college town
where I was surrounded by incredibly creative people.
Paul Soldner, one of the fathers of Western Raku
was teaching just blocks from where I lived
and I went on school fields trips to his studio .

Amazing for me to look back on that now
as Western Raku is the firing process
that I prefer to finish my work with.

With raku the intensity of removing the piece from the kiln
while the pot is still red hot
and manipulating the cooling process
demands that you are in the present moment
with focus and clarity,
its a tremendously gratifying experience.

For the rest of my childhood
we moved about Southern California.
I was one of the last generations
to enjoy the open spaces of the High Desert,
citrus laced foothills and mountains of the late 60 and 70s.
It was a place of incredible beauty,
now long gone.

I went on to become a zookeeper ,
wildlife rehabilitator and then a full time mother.

Mid way through my child rearing
I picked up a used kickwheel
small electric kiln
and started fumbling around with clay.

I am basically self taught.

Clay is as demanding as a small child.
A pot must be tended throughout its process,
or it will be lost.

The transition over the last 20 years
has been gradual .
The kids have grown ...
most of my animals have passed on..
now my home is full of pots in various stages of being.
its just as demanding as being a fulltime mother.

I am a mother of mud.

Lets get muddy

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