Kathleen Hayes' Profile

About

Hello. Welcome to my shop. I’m Kathleen and my shop is called "Made Especially For You,” also known by the acronym MEFY. Everything here was made by me in my attic workshop overlooking Goose Pond in New Hampshire. I’ve written a bit about my products what goes in to creating them.

I continually search for the best materials I can find to make the things I do. While it may be an unusual assortment of products, these are the things to which I am drawn, each using the elements that continue to infatuate and inspire me.

My shawls and scarves are sewn from vintage Kimono silk. My knowledge of the Japanese Kimono is limited to my appreciation of the beauty of the kimono as a whole, and of the silk itself—the intricate designs, amazing weaves, and beautiful color combinations are endless. I am in awe of the workmanship done…

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  • Female
  • Born on January 23
  • Joined November 10, 2010

Favorite materials

semi precious gemstones, beads, glass, pressed flowers, specialty and handmade paper, salvage items, silk fabric, kimono silk fabric

Shop

MEFY
Made Especially For You

About

Hello. Welcome to my shop. I’m Kathleen and my shop is called "Made Especially For You,” also known by the acronym MEFY. Everything here was made by me in my attic workshop overlooking Goose Pond in New Hampshire. I’ve written a bit about my products what goes in to creating them.

I continually search for the best materials I can find to make the things I do. While it may be an unusual assortment of products, these are the things to which I am drawn, each using the elements that continue to infatuate and inspire me.

My shawls and scarves are sewn from vintage Kimono silk. My knowledge of the Japanese Kimono is limited to my appreciation of the beauty of the kimono as a whole, and of the silk itself—the intricate designs, amazing weaves, and beautiful color combinations are endless. I am in awe of the workmanship done by those far more suitable than I to speak on the subject. I’ve read in posts written by younger Japanese professionals, that in today’s fast-paced world, wearing a kimono is not very practical, however is still worn on formal occasions. Whatever the reason there are many new and vintage kimono silks on the market; entire bolts, parts of bolts, and panels from disassembled kimonos can all be purchased.

It’s a privilege to use this beautiful fabric to create something also beautiful, and giving it a second life. I generally make shawls pairing two different but complimentary fabrics, and many have a coordinating fringe. The scarves are made from a single panel, sometimes with fringe. Until recently I was an “add fringe to everything” junkie! To me, adding fringe to a beautiful shawl or scarf was like applying a touch of mascara to accent a beautiful pair of eyes. Of course, not everyone likes fringe as much as I do, and I’ve become more circumspect about when to add fringe. If there’s a scarf or shawl you like and it does or doesn’t have fringe and you wish it did or didn’t, please contact me as I very well may have more of the same silk to make yours the way you’d like it.

Who doesn’t love pretty gemstones! My jewelry, primarily necklaces, varies in style. Some begin with a stunning focal stone around which a statement piece is designed; others are simply mixed strands of lovely beads, some having an asymmetrical design. I have many different stones, pearls, and beads on hand and continually add to the collection. I almost always use sterling silver, gold fill, and vermeil findings and spacers. They are a bit more costly, but the result is worth it.

My paperweights are not the ordinary paperweight. Miniature scenes and small designs hand-crafted by me are captured under glass. A good deal of time and patience goes into making them, and they can get quite intricate. Here is a review from a customer who purchased my Irish Landscape paperweight:

--“I love this little paperweight, it is truly beautiful. There is quite a bit of intricate work involved and it has been done very carefully and exactly. The colors are wonderful together - reminds me exactly of a few strolls I took on the Emerald Isle myself ten years ago. This was bought for my desk and I plan to treasure it forever. Thank you so very much!”--

I keep on hand a wide assortment of hand-made paper from around the world (Mango leaf paper from Thailand, Amate bark paper from Mexico, Chiyogami from Japan, Lokta paper from Napal, to name a few) to use as a background or to fashion an image. Scenes are sketched, paper is cut, paint is applied, and pressed flowers attached. Flowers are individually glued in place allowing the glue to dry before applying the next. When the design work is complete, the assembly begins. A special epoxy is spread evenly on the inside of the glass. The scene or design is 3-demensional, so the exact amount you use is crucial—too little may not hold the design in place; too much can leave an unsightly residue. Most paperweights have a slight recess and this must be filled to keep the design secure. After carefully applying more epoxy to the back of the design, I fill the space with a natural cork, although other fillers are sometimes used. When all glue is thoroughly dry a colored felt backing is applied to make the seal and protect the surface of the furniture.
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While well-sealed, paperweights are not waterproof and are not dishwasher safe. I use a vinegar and water solution to clean them, although there is nothing wrong with using a commercial glass cleaner.

It’s a very time-consuming process. Because of this, I only make a few each year, unless there is a request for a custom piece. One such request came from a gentleman who wanted something made to honor his wife’s triumph over breast cancer. Custom pieces are done in collaboration with the buyer who will receive drafts and progress shots for approval.

My current paperweights: While using the same materials as those talked about above, the paperweights currently available are not an example of those that are so very time-consuming.

So, that’s a little bit about what I make and offer in my shop. New ideas continually run through my mind about other things to try. I will keep adding new items as time goes on.

Originally from Northampton, Massachusetts, living along the Connecticut River, I moved to Canaan, New Hampshire about 20 years ago, and worked at Dartmouth College until I retired in 2010. My home is on a beautiful little lake called Goose Pond. The Pond (a deceptive name for its size) and the area surrounding it support loons, various ducks, geese, moose, deer, bear, fisher cats, coyotes, black bears, bobcats, mountain lions, river otters, red foxes, bald eagles, hawks, owls, and more, along with an abundance of reptiles and other aquatic life. People love to come here to fish. The Small-Mouth Bass and White Perch records for New Hampshire come from Goose Pond. The Pond also has Large-Mouth Bass, Rock Bass, Pickerel, Yellow Perch, and a variety of pan fish. While fishing is not my particular pass-time, I love it here; the water is beautiful for kayaking and canoeing, and getting on eye-level with a loon's red eyes is an incredible experience. There are trails to walk in the woods behind my home, and the Appalachian Trail runs very close-by. It's all quite inspiring!

I have been making crafts my entire life and am extremely happy that I can now devote my time to do the things I love.

My home and workshop are smoke-free. I do have two beautiful and very spoiled long-hair cats, but much to their dismay they are not allowed in my workshop!

I am a member of the Lebanon Arts & Crafts Association in Lebanon, NH.

My thanks to you for reading through this narrative, and I sincerely hope you visit again.

Best,
Kathleen


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