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Stephanie Sadler's Profile

About

A SHORT ( BUT INTERESTING) HISTORY*
* Involves bumpy dirt roads and small Colombian village

Nestled deep in the Andes mountains of Colombia is a tiny village. Mules amble along dirt roads, staple foods are plantain, rice and yucca, and it’s not unusual for people who live there to have little to no access to hot water or internet. At the beginning of 2011, I arrived, the only foreigner for miles.

To occupy my time, I joined a local course on how to make decorative art pieces from guadua (similar to bamboo). When the classes ended, I carried on, teaching myself to create unique jewelry.

During this time, I met some incredibly talented and resourceful Colombians. They were using the same material to design candle holders, jewelry boxes and home décor. Then other…

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  • Female
  • Born on December 28
  • Joined March 30, 2011

Favorite materials

fique, guadua, seeds, beads, cord, necklace clasps, jump rings, crimps

About

A SHORT ( BUT INTERESTING) HISTORY*
* Involves bumpy dirt roads and small Colombian village

Nestled deep in the Andes mountains of Colombia is a tiny village. Mules amble along dirt roads, staple foods are plantain, rice and yucca, and it’s not unusual for people who live there to have little to no access to hot water or internet. At the beginning of 2011, I arrived, the only foreigner for miles.

To occupy my time, I joined a local course on how to make decorative art pieces from guadua (similar to bamboo). When the classes ended, I carried on, teaching myself to create unique jewelry.

During this time, I met some incredibly talented and resourceful Colombians. They were using the same material to design candle holders, jewelry boxes and home décor. Then other artisans started to emerge. A group of women who had an incredible skill caught my attention. They were weaving beautiful handbags, wristlets and hair clips from a material called fique – all by hand.

The finished pieces that these women created were sitting, unused and un-appreciated, in their homes. Most of them raise children and work on the farms for income. They have limited access to the world outside of the village and none of them speak English. So that’s when I decided I needed to do something to help them share their talents. Made in Mogotes was officially born in August 2011.

Your purchases will benefit the local people who create them with love and you'll get a real sense of where the product comes from when you shop here. All of our products are handmade and most can be custom-made. Just ask!

The Retirement Gig section is products made by my dad :)

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ABOUT ME:
I'm from New York originally, but went to London to start a career when I finished my BA. After three years, I fell in love with a Colombian guy who missed home. And a year later, I packed up my London flat, quit my job and headed off on a different adventure - to a farm in rural Colombia, in a small village called Mogotes that many Colombians haven't even heard of. With no job prospects for a city girl, I needed a way to pass my time. After taking a four week course working with a local material called guadua - which is similar to bamboo - I started making jewelry which I sell here along with the products from the villagers. I am now back in London.

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LINKS:

Blog with promotions, products and life in Mogotes | http://madeinmogotes.wordpress.com

Colombia travel blog | http://www.littlecolombiaobservationist.com
London travel blog | http://littlelondonobservationist.wordpress.com

Facebook | http://www.facebook.com/madeinmogotes
Facebook | http://www.facebook.com/photolarks

Etsy shop (photography): http://www.photolarks.etsy.com

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NOTE ON SHIPPING:
Some products have higher shipping costs because they are sent directly from Colombia. Others are regularly sent to New York and shipped by my parents on to customers from there which makes the shipping costs much lower. Other pieces are shipped from London where I am currently residing.

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