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Peter Adams' Profile

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Hi, I began my art career in Switzerland in the 1970's where I learned painting from Paul Elben. Since then I have gone on to earn a B.A. degree in philosophy while receiving further art training under Bernard Arnest. I have since completed all coursework towards my PhD in philosophy with an emphasis on studies in art and aesthetics. Somewhere along the way, I picked up an MBA, so now I'm able to combine art and business and now have excellent artists who help me complete the paintings offered here on Etsy. In addition, profits from this site are donated to BizGirls.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching entrepreneurship and leadership skills to high school age girls. BizGirls undergo an intensive program that results in becoming CEO of their own e-commerce company and they receive ongoing mentorship and guidance through the program. Your purchase from Omniportraits helps to support tomorrow's business leaders…

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  • Male
  • Born on October 6
  • Joined December 12, 2009

Favorite materials

Oil paints on canvas

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About

Hi, I began my art career in Switzerland in the 1970's where I learned painting from Paul Elben. Since then I have gone on to earn a B.A. degree in philosophy while receiving further art training under Bernard Arnest. I have since completed all coursework towards my PhD in philosophy with an emphasis on studies in art and aesthetics. Somewhere along the way, I picked up an MBA, so now I'm able to combine art and business and now have excellent artists who help me complete the paintings offered here on Etsy. In addition, profits from this site are donated to BizGirls.org, a non-profit organization dedicated to teaching entrepreneurship and leadership skills to high school age girls. BizGirls undergo an intensive program that results in becoming CEO of their own e-commerce company and they receive ongoing mentorship and guidance through the program. Your purchase from Omniportraits helps to support tomorrow's business leaders.

People ask me "are your paintings for real?" And the answer is "yes". I use a realistic style because I've found that is what people seem to like the most. I can do other styles, but this is the default. This style results in lively paintings with expressive faces and lifelike skin tones. There is absolutely no technology used in producing these paintings, other than when I consult with you for additions/deletions from your original photo - then I'll use Photoshop to create a mockup. Everything else is done the old fashioned way with pencil, oil paints, canvas, brushes and disciplined artistic effort. You are free to request a half-way photo, just to see how your painting is progressing. Here's a link to an example that shows partial completion, pencil work for the outlines, and hand painted portions that are complete. http://www.etsy.com/listing/54901404/custom-portrait-painting-12x16-with

I find that there are three kinds of photographs when it comes to being subjects for a painting:

1) Those that may be acceptable as a photo, but would really not be worthwhile to paint. I hate to say it, but I have some good examples of photos that have been painted, and even though the execution of the painting was good, I would still not call it "art". It really just looks like a snapshot that got painted. Many photos are taken from far away and the faces are hard to see and nearly impossible to paint. A face should be at least 2" on the canvas in order to be able to paint it properly!
2) Photos that have good elements in them, but which need to be cropped, mixed with other photos, have the background simplified, or just changed, etc. A lot of great portrait photos, especially in wedding situations, have "noise" in the background. This could be anything from dirty dishes at a banquet to a messy living room. These photos benefit from modifications such as adding a "portrait background" that focuses in on the people without distractions.
3) Photos that are just meant to be painted. These are well composed, often taken by professionals. Every element in the photo is working and hangs together to make a good composition.

Why do we even have paintings when photos are good representations of reality?
I think good art is a piece that draws you into it. Of course good photos draw you in, but a good painting has a special effect on people. When you look at a photo, your mind quickly "categorizes" the things in the photo as things and you are not drawn in further. When you look at a good painting, there is a "difference" between the thing painted and its representation. This stalls the categorization process and you look at the thing more closely to understand it without snap decisions or preconceptions.

I think the reason we still have painting is that we like that process of coming to know something. There is an intentionality to a fine painting that engages the eye and brings you beyond the "everydayness" of a photo and it conveys meaning.

If we can have art that helps bring meaningfulness to our lives, then that is a good thing.

Thank you,
Peter Adams

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