Pat Cranor's Profile

About

Pat Cranor is a California native now residing in the San Diego area.

He stills remembers the day he knew he wanted to become an artist. It just so happens to be the same day he won his first award in art.

Riding an athletic scholarship to college, Pat turned more toward commercial graphic design. Graduating from Idaho State University with a degree in Business Marketing and a minor in Art, he niftily linked the two disciplines together, moved back to Southern California and began a successful career as an advertising agency art director.

When his computer executive wife took a once-in-a-lifetime job opportunity in Europe, Pat went along and offered his services as a freelance graphic designer to various ad agencies in Belgium and Holland…

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  • Male
  • Born on December 12
  • Joined March 28, 2011

Favorite materials

Watercolors

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About

Pat Cranor is a California native now residing in the San Diego area.

He stills remembers the day he knew he wanted to become an artist. It just so happens to be the same day he won his first award in art.

Riding an athletic scholarship to college, Pat turned more toward commercial graphic design. Graduating from Idaho State University with a degree in Business Marketing and a minor in Art, he niftily linked the two disciplines together, moved back to Southern California and began a successful career as an advertising agency art director.

When his computer executive wife took a once-in-a-lifetime job opportunity in Europe, Pat went along and offered his services as a freelance graphic designer to various ad agencies in Belgium and Holland.

In 1987, Pat and his wife switched continents yet again, this time moving to Japan. There it wasn’t long before Pat began painting the striking, colorful and culture-clashing scenes he saw all around. Living in Osaka and Kobe for more than five years, Pat developed a particular admiration for the wood block prints of the Edo period. He was so influenced that he even developed his own similar style of brushing layer upon layer of brilliantly vivid textured watercolors evocative of the Japanese wood block print technique.

After his first son was born, Pat painted a series of animals designed for his son’s nursery. Child-development experts suggested that bright colors and repeated images were beneficial to a baby’s development, so Pat applied this knowledge by developing a style of taking one image, repeating it, and putting it into the composition.

After returning to the United States, Pat took his warm and humorous “animals” to the streets and into the greeting card and print market.

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