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Art Seymour's Profile

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My lifetime involvement with glass began at age 5 when I became mesmerized by an antique glass prism paperweight at my grandmother’s home. For hours on end I would gaze into the depths of that prism, dreaming and wondering at the magic that could create an object of such deep transparent color ,a color so rich it seemed edible.,yet so transparent I could see objects clearly out the other side.
I never fully recovered from that experience, and today,57 years later ,find most of my days consumed by activities which are in one way or another related to the production of glass objects.
I started working with stained glass in 1969 and operated a working studio making custom commissions for 10 years.I began blowing glass in 1977 at California State University , at Chico California. Glass blowing became a passion for me, and remains so today.
I spent 6 years…

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  • Male
  • Joined November 4, 2008

Favorite materials

Glass, Extreme Heat

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About

My lifetime involvement with glass began at age 5 when I became mesmerized by an antique glass prism paperweight at my grandmother’s home. For hours on end I would gaze into the depths of that prism, dreaming and wondering at the magic that could create an object of such deep transparent color ,a color so rich it seemed edible.,yet so transparent I could see objects clearly out the other side.
I never fully recovered from that experience, and today,57 years later ,find most of my days consumed by activities which are in one way or another related to the production of glass objects.
I started working with stained glass in 1969 and operated a working studio making custom commissions for 10 years.I began blowing glass in 1977 at California State University , at Chico California. Glass blowing became a passion for me, and remains so today.
I spent 6 years blowing production art glass for Nourot Glass Studio in Benicia, California, and ran the grinding shop for Nourot during that time.It was here that I gained my experience in glass lapidary.
I made my first beads out of horn and fossil ivory in 1975, and made my first glass beads in 1978 at the university glass studio. I have been making glass beads of one type or another continuously since that time.
Beginning with a project making simple fused beads in a clay mold, I moved on to making clear cased latticino cane beads. 11 years ago I pulled my first chevron cane and I haven’t looked back since. The combination of furnace work and lapidary finish resulting in a finished bead of such precision design appeals to me, and I have spent the majority of the last 11 years exploring the design potential of the chevron. I’ve experimented with lamp work and find it a less gratifying experience than furnace work,but find the lamp a useful tool in the studio. My most recent and most exciting work employs a combination of lamp work on a finished polished chevron, which has to be reground for the final finish. This often results in a bead with as much as 12-20 hours of time involvement.
As I make these beads primarily for my own enjoyment, I don’t let the complexity of production deter me from pursuing the final object.
I feel that glass ,as a substance, brings to physical reality the abstract concepts of light and color. I could not imagine working in a medium more exciting or more full of magic.
I still blow art glass in my studio and I still find magic in my grandmothers paperweight. With my beads and marbles and vessels, I like to think that I’m leaving behind some magic to inspire future glass makers.

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