Sandra G. Coffman's Profile

About

My training is in the healing Arts and Sciences, and in particular, in Psychophysiology, Neuropharmacology, and Clinical Psychology. I completed a Ph.D. at the University of Southern California in Psychology, after having worked as a Registered Nurse for a dozen years. My life journey has led me to appreciate Complementary approaches to health and wellness.

Our family legacy includes Cherokee ancestry, but I am not on any tribal rolls. I recently found my face in U.S. Government National Archives, on a Kiowa (a Plains tribe) elder named White Bear (aka Satanta), of all places. How can I look so much like this particular individual and not share some genetics? Coyote is always a possibility and it was great fun to find anyway. So I thank coyote, and the U.S. Government for taking and saving that photograph. I hope their archives will be preserved indefinitely…

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  • Female
  • Born on October 9
  • Joined November 3, 2008

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About

My training is in the healing Arts and Sciences, and in particular, in Psychophysiology, Neuropharmacology, and Clinical Psychology. I completed a Ph.D. at the University of Southern California in Psychology, after having worked as a Registered Nurse for a dozen years. My life journey has led me to appreciate Complementary approaches to health and wellness.

Our family legacy includes Cherokee ancestry, but I am not on any tribal rolls. I recently found my face in U.S. Government National Archives, on a Kiowa (a Plains tribe) elder named White Bear (aka Satanta), of all places. How can I look so much like this particular individual and not share some genetics? Coyote is always a possibility and it was great fun to find anyway. So I thank coyote, and the U.S. Government for taking and saving that photograph. I hope their archives will be preserved indefinitely.

Having captured my attention, I did some research (among U.S. Government Free Access Records, e.g., The Handbook Of Texas) and found an amazing story about White Bear and his cohorts, and that research is presented in a set of notecards that opened this shop--a story of four Kiowa chiefs (including White Bear), decisions they made, how they lived, and how they died. And the ANIMAL MEDICINES they relied upon for healing, protection, and good fortune. Satanta's father, Red Tipi, was a medicine man and keeper of the Kiowa tribal medicine bundle. It is good to honor our ancestors, no matter what our culture:

"Walking, I am listening to a deeper way. Suddenly all my ancestors are behind me. Be still, they say. Watch and listen. You are the result of the love of thousands" (Linda Hogan, 1947, Native American writer).

My WORKBOOK "Find Your Animal Totem ..." integrates Animal Medicine/archetypes with 3 key factors well known to Western Psychology. My WORKBOOK and INTUITIVE READING will help you to find your true animal nature and any areas of imbalance, with whom you have most in common, and what lessons may be learned from those who are most different from you.

SELF KNOWLEDGE IS GOOD MEDICINE.

Tohi (a Cherokee concept that acknowledges that when we are at peace with all around us, that is health).

Nods to raven and grandmother spider,

Adanvdo Yonv (Spirit Bear)


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BLOGGER: http://www.SpiritBearCreations.blogspot.com

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