SupportHer's Profile

About

I’m not a joiner. When I went through breast cancer treatments I didn’t talk about it to most people. I had a couple of really close friends that I trusted to be private with what I was telling them. I was actually very angry at what was going on. I’ve always felt in control and now not so much. During my chemo treatments, when I felt so lethargic, wasted and … bald… I would wear a sweatshirt with skeletons giving the finger. I suppose the pink ribbons just weren’t nasty enough for me. I put every bit of energy in following my surgeon and oncologist’s treatment regiment but, after 8 months of chemotherapy, some of the cancer had survived and my right breast had to be removed. I mourned the loss of my breast, and interestingly enough, I missed it more emotionally then physically. We had been through puberty, boyfriends, swimsuit seasons and most endearingly the birth of my son…

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  • Female
  • Born on December 20
  • Joined May 21, 2009

Favorite materials

Glass, Gas, Fire, Oxygen

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About

I’m not a joiner. When I went through breast cancer treatments I didn’t talk about it to most people. I had a couple of really close friends that I trusted to be private with what I was telling them. I was actually very angry at what was going on. I’ve always felt in control and now not so much. During my chemo treatments, when I felt so lethargic, wasted and … bald… I would wear a sweatshirt with skeletons giving the finger. I suppose the pink ribbons just weren’t nasty enough for me. I put every bit of energy in following my surgeon and oncologist’s treatment regiment but, after 8 months of chemotherapy, some of the cancer had survived and my right breast had to be removed. I mourned the loss of my breast, and interestingly enough, I missed it more emotionally then physically. We had been through puberty, boyfriends, swimsuit seasons and most endearingly the birth of my son together.

E P I P H A N Y
That was 41 months ago. Most recently I went through reconstructive surgery. I lost my mojo for a while and had to find it so I could go back into the operating room. My plastic surgeon was so . . . surgeon-like, that when he came to see me in pre-op I had a gift for him. (I wanted him to know who I was, not just be the next patient on his "to do" list.) I made him meditation beads. Every other bead on the strand was shaped like a breast from large to petite. He smiled and said, "Are these what I think they are?" He and I bonded just then and we both felt special. Best of all though, I felt I was paying tribute to my lost breast by making the beads. (That’s the epiphany part, paying tribute to my breast)

P A S S I N G - T H E - T U D E
Since my reconstruction, I finally feel free to move on. (See my "after" photo on the shop banner ... you know someone actually asked me if a nipple would grow back on my new breast!) Anyway, for the first time I FEEL grateful, not just know that I'm grateful to the cancer support community. I attempt to say thank you by giving worry/meditation breast beads to those who saved me.

If you are riding the roller coaster front and center or are the friend riding in the next car back, these beads may offer laughs, smiles, maybe hope or tears. I make the beads to represent milestones and the worry strands to hold through each treatment or doctor's visit. I focus courage into every bead. They are clean, bright and healthy glass Boobeads. I make a variety of colors and shapes, some more literal than others, but all are made by me, from the hand of one survivor to the next.

If you'd like, visit my home studio at www.thehenhousestudio.com or if you have any questions please email me at lynn[at]thehenhousestudio.com

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