Emily Renee's Profile

About

Welcome to my shop, where everything you'll find is handcrafted with love and creativity by yours truly.
I use quality fiber in all my yarns, all of which I craft with care in a pet-friendly, smoke-free environment. Each is washed in a mild, twist-setting bath, and those marked as such are lightly scented with lavender oil.
I make an effort to list all the items as accurately as possible, so that the possibility of discrepancies between what you purchase and what you receive are greatly diminished. Bear in mind that colors may appear slightly different than the original, as every one's monitors are different.
Enjoy and happy shopping!

~~And as of June 2012, my handspun yarns and handknit items are for sale in Pip & Lola's shop in the Tacoma Freighthouse in Washington, along with many other fine handmade items from local vendors!! Come and visit…

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  • Female
  • Born on April 15
  • Joined May 23, 2011

Favorite materials

BFL wool, tussah silk, wool, cormo wool, alpaca

About

Welcome to my shop, where everything you'll find is handcrafted with love and creativity by yours truly.
I use quality fiber in all my yarns, all of which I craft with care in a pet-friendly, smoke-free environment. Each is washed in a mild, twist-setting bath, and those marked as such are lightly scented with lavender oil.
I make an effort to list all the items as accurately as possible, so that the possibility of discrepancies between what you purchase and what you receive are greatly diminished. Bear in mind that colors may appear slightly different than the original, as every one's monitors are different.
Enjoy and happy shopping!

~~And as of June 2012, my handspun yarns and handknit items are for sale in Pip & Lola's shop in the Tacoma Freighthouse in Washington, along with many other fine handmade items from local vendors!! Come and visit us in person if you're in town!


~My Spinning Beginning~
Though I was raised on the sweet goodness of fiber crafts - coming from a family that has knitted, crocheted, and stitched for generations on end, I never really got into the making of the fiber goodness that is so beloved to me now, until just recently. Though a part of me always wanted to...

During third grade, the kids of my class were doing a study on the pioneers and their journey across the west on the Oregon Trail. Everyone had pioneer names (I was Ann Anderson), and a handmade diary to record the trials and tribulations of traveling for months in a covered wagon with the rest of their classmates. Once, my character was chased and stung by a swarm of bees and I had to write about how awful that was, and how my little family of classmates (we were all split into family groups that traveled the Oregon Trail together) treated the multitude of bee stings.
We also learned some of the crafts that the people of that time depended upon for clothing, sustenance, and whatnot: the girls learned how to knit and sew. But the boys got to learn things that seemed to me to be a lot more fun at the time than knitting (which I didn't like) and sewing (which I already knew how to do), and I tried everything I could to join their group. But, being a girl, I couldn't.
Oh well. We had loads of fun anyway!

The study ended at the end of the school year with the entire class dressing up in handmade pioneer costumes, and going on a field trip to an old ranch a couple of miles from the school that housed some of the original buildings and equipment from that time! It was set up to receive tourists, I believe, and so kept everything authentic and well-maintained: including the original family house, a furnished one-room schoolhouse, barn, tools, and a bunch of old spinning equipment.
We spent the day living the lives of pioneers and settlers (or as close to it as we could get): touring the old house, and looking at all the neat tools and crafts and utensils; spending an hour in the school house with the chalkboards and readers, and laughing at my friend and field buddy for the day who "got caught" with a slingshot in his desk and had to sit in the corner wearing a dunce cap ( which was especially hilarious, seeing as he was the sweet trouble-maker of the class); and trying a few of the chores that the settlers would have needed to do every day.
I was fascinated when my teachers spread washed wool onto the blanketed ground, passed out carders to each of us, and taught us how to skirt and card the wool, and how that fit into the process of making yarn! Afterward, we all got in line with our handfuls of carded wool, and one by one tried spinning it on a rather large Saxony style wheel.
Of course I wanted to make the perfect yarn, and was infinitely frustrated when my 8-year old hands consistently drafted fiber that was uneven and kept breaking! All the kids waiting in line behind me suffered for a few minutes as they observed my obsessive zeal for mastering that darned wheel, before they, in a group effort, kicked me off so that they could have a turn.
I was always a little upset that I never got the chance to master that wheel like I intended.

I tried again a few years later with cotton balls, but my success was limited. I finger-spun about half of a big bag and then crocheted the resulting string-like fluff into a small, cushy handkerchief. It slowly disintegrated over the next couple of days, and after that I largely gave up on the idea of spinning.

Eleven years later I found myself sitting at an electric spinner at the Madrona Fiber Festival Winter Retreat, making that same slubbed yarn that I did when I was 8 years old. This time I learned to call it novelty yarn, and with that new name came more pleasure in the craft. A few minutes later I was learning how to spin slub-free yarn on a Turkish drop-spindle, and fell completely in love with it!
Later that day, I was sitting in the hotel lobby waiting for my lift home, alternately practicing with my new spindle and petting my pound of brightly colored roving, when I suddenly remembered that day in third grade and my regret at never being able to master that spinning wheel.
I couldn't help but giggle delightedly at the strange twist of fate that now found me fully equipped and fast learning how to put into practice the desire and motivation planted in me back on that field trip to spin really beautiful yarns!

I've been spinning ever since, and though I am newer to spinning than I am to my favorite yarn and string crafts, years of experience working with yarns continue to help guide me in making the beautiful, quality yarns that I've always wanted to make.
I never list any item that I myself wouldn't use, and am immensely proud to display what I have accomplished.

I hope you enjoy the beauty of my hand spun fibers as much as I do!

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