Marian Quanbeck Dahlberg's Profile

About

MORE GOING ON!!! I am starting to sell the LINEN YARN that I use in weaving my textiles!! CHEAPEST ANYWHERE!!! No Kidding!!

**BIG ANNOUNCEMENT**
1. Dec 2012 - Featured as an artist at The Foundry Home Goods in Minneapolis, MN. Fantastic little store!! See this review by Anna Hoeschen at http://www.handfulofsalt.com/profile-anna-hillegass-the-foundry-home-goods-store/
2. Nov 2012 - Featured as an artist at the The Grand Hand Gallery in St. Paul, MN. (http://thegrandhand.com/artists-by-media/fiber/marian-quanbeck-dahlberg/)
3. August 2012 - Became a Vendor Partner with Wayfair.com (http://www.wayfair.com/Vava!-Veve!-C1764096.html?redir=vava!+veve!&rtype=6)
4. July 2012 - Väva! Veve! towels were seen in Sunset Magazine!!
5. June 21, 2012 - Väva! Veve! towels have been featured on Remodelista.com (http://…

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  • Female
  • Born on October 16
  • Joined September 10, 2009

Favorite materials

Linen, Cotton, Silk, Wool, Paper, and Chocolate

Shop

VavaVeve
Handwoven Linen Textiles for your body and...

About

MORE GOING ON!!! I am starting to sell the LINEN YARN that I use in weaving my textiles!! CHEAPEST ANYWHERE!!! No Kidding!!

**BIG ANNOUNCEMENT**
1. Dec 2012 - Featured as an artist at The Foundry Home Goods in Minneapolis, MN. Fantastic little store!! See this review by Anna Hoeschen at http://www.handfulofsalt.com/profile-anna-hillegass-the-foundry-home-goods-store/
2. Nov 2012 - Featured as an artist at the The Grand Hand Gallery in St. Paul, MN. (http://thegrandhand.com/artists-by-media/fiber/marian-quanbeck-dahlberg/)
3. August 2012 - Became a Vendor Partner with Wayfair.com (http://www.wayfair.com/Vava!-Veve!-C1764096.html?redir=vava!+veve!&rtype=6)
4. July 2012 - Väva! Veve! towels were seen in Sunset Magazine!!
5. June 21, 2012 - Väva! Veve! towels have been featured on Remodelista.com (http://remodelista.com/posts/the-changing-of-the-towels)
6. April 2011 - My Etsy shop has been mentioned in the UK Magazine, "Selvedge"!! The publisher, Polly Leonard, contacted me by Etsy convo saying she wanted to put together a 'roundup of her Etsy favorites for the next issue, and would it be possible to send her some high res images of my products to use in the feature?' Look for it in the March/April edition of Selvedge! http://www.selvedge.org/
7. March 2012 - Featured in Opensky.com with Allegra Hicks!


About the Artist
I was a Certified Interior Designer, designing corporate and commercial facilities for the past 30 years. I retired after owning my own design firm for about half of those 30 years. While designing interiors I had many opportunities to examine luscious textiles in detail. The fabrics today are so incredible, using all kinds of materials, from plastics to metal, to achieve a look and function; while color application has reached new heights. Very inspiring stuff! Being the right brainer that I am, I thought, “I could do that. . .” So I pursued an education in handweaving and continue to pursue my passion in textiles. The future always holds something wonderful, and that's where I'm heading.

LIVING TO WEAVE, AND WEAVING TO LIVE. MY SEARCH FOR A FULFILLING LIFE, WEAVING CLOTH ONE THREAD AT A TIME.

The linen yarn that I use in the weft yarns of my weavings comes from one of the oldest flax mills in Lithuania. The linen yarn that I use in the warp yarns of my weavings comes from Belgium, the historical center of flax production. Both mills produce linen yarn that is pesticide free and grown with great care towards the earth, using less water and fertilizer than other natural fibers such as cotton.

Some Linen Facts:

Flax is a rotating and renewable crop which requires very little input in the way of pesticides or fertilizers.

The linen fibre is obtained by subjecting Flax plant stalks to a series of operations, including retting (a fermentation process), drying, crushing, and beating.

It's processing into fibre (see retting and scutching) respects the environment, as it is purely mechanical (using neither solvents nor water) in opposition to man made fibres such as viscose, bamboo or maize.

As in ancient times, linen is woven from the fibers of the flax plant and is an absolute natural resource – perhaps the most ecological fabric available today.

The production of linen fabric uses five to twenty times less water and energy than the production of cotton or other synthetic fabrics. It has very little waste, which is biodegradable.

Linen fabrics are biodegradable and recyclable.

Linen is renowned for its spectacular durability and long life. The tensile strength of linen thread is twice as high as that of cotton and three times that of wool. Linen dries more quickly than cotton, and is more slowly affected by exposure to sunlight.

Flax yarns and fabrics increase about 20% in strength on wetting. Linen is also therefore stronger when being washed, resulting in greater longevity than, for example, cotton.

Linen can absorb up to 20% of it's weight in moisture while still feeling dry to the touch.

Because linen absorbs and releases moisture quickly and is a good conductor of heat, linen garments feel cool to wearers.

Linen does not cause allergic reactions and is helpful in treating a number of allergic disorders.

The Flax cell is highly compatible with the human cell thereby producing benevolent effects on the human organism. Linen possesses rare bacteriological properties. Resistant to fungus and bacteria, it is found to be an effective barrier to some diseases.

Linen cloth does not accumulate static electricity - even a small blend of flax fibers (up to 10%) to a cloth is enough to eliminate the static electricity effect.

Linen is virtually lint free, non-static, non-allergenic, naturally insect-repellent and gives UV protection.

Linen may be washed at around 200 deg F and should be ironed when damp. When being washed the first time, linen shrinks, as is the case with most natural fibers

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