Molly Bernier's Profile

About

Welcome to Whimsy House. I hope you find something you can't resist... Spoil yourself or a friend today!

I started Whimsy House on a whim, of course, in the spring of 2007. Shortly after my second daughter was born it quickly became evident that my "stay-at-home-mommy" title was overtaking that of "interior designer career woman." My passion to remain in a creative business lead to the start of my Whimsy House on Etsy. I later added http://www.FabricHouse.etsy.com and http://www.TheVintageFlirt.etsy.com to my family of Etsy shops. In the early 90's I owned The Angelic Rabbit, an antiques and gift shop, with my mom in Middleton, WI. My love for vintage goodness bloomed and my retail knowledge grew quickly. All my experiences and interests merged with the creation of Whimsy House.

What a blessing it is to be able to stay home with my…

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  • Female
  • Born on June 27
  • Joined March 25, 2008

Favorite materials

buttons, fabric, ribbon, felt, wool, vintage anything, silver, turquoise, leather, pearls

Shop

About

Welcome to Whimsy House. I hope you find something you can't resist... Spoil yourself or a friend today!

I started Whimsy House on a whim, of course, in the spring of 2007. Shortly after my second daughter was born it quickly became evident that my "stay-at-home-mommy" title was overtaking that of "interior designer career woman." My passion to remain in a creative business lead to the start of my Whimsy House on Etsy. I later added http://www.FabricHouse.etsy.com and http://www.TheVintageFlirt.etsy.com to my family of Etsy shops. In the early 90's I owned The Angelic Rabbit, an antiques and gift shop, with my mom in Middleton, WI. My love for vintage goodness bloomed and my retail knowledge grew quickly. All my experiences and interests merged with the creation of Whimsy House.

What a blessing it is to be able to stay home with my little ones while remaining on a fulfilling creative path. I owe an enormous amount of gratitude to my husband, family and friends for supporting me and helping to make my small business a success.

My designs are inspired by all things vintage, the sentimental pieces of the past. I derive an immense amount of pleasure through creating one-of-a-kind accessories with findings from yesteryear. I turn ridiculously giddy over a mason jar of old buttons, a box filled with well worn fabrics or trims, a broken down jewelry box of partner-less earrings and strands of old beads. Oh, the world of possibilities! The pendants, rings and brooches just screaming to be born!

Again, thank you for stopping by and checking out my designs. It's you, my clientele, that make this ultimately possible and for that I will always be grateful.

XOXO Molly
My blog: http://www.WhimsyHouseGoodness.blogspot.com
My website: http://www.WhimsyHouse.com

~

I'm learning more everyday about the world of vintage buttons. So many beautiful colors, interesting designs and fascinating materials! Here are a few notes and details:

Celluloid: First used as a substitute for tusk ivory and wood. Buttons constructed with celluloid parts appeared in the 1897 Sears & Roebuck catalog. These buttons are rather fragile.

Bakelite: Bakelite buttons became very stylish about 1940 to 1950. They produced a fresh warm feel, the color combinations were delightful.

Lucite: Lucite, the trade name of synthetic thermoplastic acrylic resin, was used to make buttons in the mid 1930s. Lucite was produced by DuPont Plastics in Arlington, New Jersey. During World War II, Lucite was used to make gun turrets as well as other practical home items.

Vegetable Ivory: First presented at the 1862 Universal Exposition in Paris, “vegetable ivory” buttons were carved from the corozo nuts of the tague palm. The material resembled ivory, therefore “vegetable ivory”. The material was so dense, the dye would only penetrate the surface layer, the interior remains uncolored. Production reached a peak between 1870 and 1920.

Mother-of-Pearl: Pearl buttons are made from the nacreous (pearly) lining of shells of various marine or freshwater mollusca found principally in warm waters. Freshwater pearl buttons have less iridescence than ocean pearls. Eighteenth century pearl buttons were large (approximately 1-1/4 inches) and considered the most beautiful ocean pearl buttons ever made.

Luster Finishes: Luster is a metallic sheen applied to black glass buttons for a wonderfully, unique look.

Brass: An alloy of copper and zinc, brass has been used to manufacture more buttons than any other material. The brass button industry peeked between 1820 & 1850. This period is often called the “Golden Age” because of the superior quality of these buttons.

Pewter: In the late 18th & early 19th centuries, pewter was used for buttons in men’s fashions, but by 1830 the brass button replaced the pewter button. Pewter buttons appeared again in the late 19th century, however, this time in ladies’ fashions.

I hope you enjoy your stay and shopping experience at Whimsy House. I treasure every customer and consider you my friends. Many thanks for making my world a happier place :)

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