Close

Paul Haigh's Profile

About

Welcome to Wiley Hill Mudworks!

My name is Paul Haigh. I have degrees in chemistry, but burning things is what I really love to do. I live in a log home in NH with my beautiful wife and 3 goofy little dogs.

But you're here about pottery, ya?

I read a quote somewhere that in pottery there are clay people, glaze people and fire people. When all 3 come together, then you have one of the great artists.

I suppose that I'm a fire person. Loading and firing my 40+ cubic foot woodfired kiln is usually a community effort, with several potters taking part in the 3 day process. The kiln is slowly fired to 2370 F, which is hot enough to melt the wood ash produced. The flame and ash do much of the decorating for me, leaving their warm mark and…

Read more

  • Male
  • Born on January 31
  • Joined January 11, 2009

Favorite materials

Stoneware clay, Porcelain

Shop

About

Welcome to Wiley Hill Mudworks!

My name is Paul Haigh. I have degrees in chemistry, but burning things is what I really love to do. I live in a log home in NH with my beautiful wife and 3 goofy little dogs.

But you're here about pottery, ya?

I read a quote somewhere that in pottery there are clay people, glaze people and fire people. When all 3 come together, then you have one of the great artists.

I suppose that I'm a fire person. Loading and firing my 40+ cubic foot woodfired kiln is usually a community effort, with several potters taking part in the 3 day process. The kiln is slowly fired to 2370 F, which is hot enough to melt the wood ash produced. The flame and ash do much of the decorating for me, leaving their warm mark and forming a melted ash glaze on pots.

The marks that the fire and ash leave on woodfired pottery are unique. How the pot was made, the clay, where it's placed, the wood used, the stoking pattern of the kiln, and even the weather all influence the results. You can often see the "shadows" of other pots in the results, which always starts some speculation about what was there and what the fire was doing.

My mom puts the pottery I've made her over the years on a shelf, where I think it cannot be truly appreciated. I want people to see the subtle and not so subtle effects and discover them more every time they use these pieces.

You spend a lot of time with that coffee cup, or reaching for garlic or a dog cookie from a jar. I hope that having art that you use every day might be part of slowing down and appreciating what might otherwise be mundane. I hope that a serving bowl or juice glass reminds you that eating should be about more than just quickly putting calories into your body.

Thanks for visiting, and don't hesitate to email for pictures of the kiln firing, close up shots of the amazing detail that the fire leaves us on these pots, or any other info.

Paul Haigh

Unfollow username?

Are you sure you want to stop following this person?