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Alina Neacy's Profile

About

I've always been an activist for environmental and social causes (often they are the same thing) and so when I wanted to start a business, it had to be environmentally conscious.

I had learned about Maquiladoras: sweatshops in Latin America where poor people work in basic slavery conditions to make clothing, and I knew I didn’t want to support that.

So I came across a sewing machine and started making stuff, and found that I was pretty good at it! And the more I looked into it, the more shocked I became at just how much destruction takes place to make the clothes we wear every day.

Conventional cotton is the most destructive agricultural crop on the planet. It takes massive amounts of petroleum-derived fertilizers, pesticides and water to grow. It depletes the soil and only the fluffy white…

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  • Female
  • Born on March 8
  • Joined August 18, 2010

Favorite materials

Hemp, organic cotton, bamboo, Tencel, soy

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About

I've always been an activist for environmental and social causes (often they are the same thing) and so when I wanted to start a business, it had to be environmentally conscious.

I had learned about Maquiladoras: sweatshops in Latin America where poor people work in basic slavery conditions to make clothing, and I knew I didn’t want to support that.

So I came across a sewing machine and started making stuff, and found that I was pretty good at it! And the more I looked into it, the more shocked I became at just how much destruction takes place to make the clothes we wear every day.

Conventional cotton is the most destructive agricultural crop on the planet. It takes massive amounts of petroleum-derived fertilizers, pesticides and water to grow. It depletes the soil and only the fluffy white flowers of the plant are used.

In India and developing countries without the environmental restrictions of more developed nations, western agricultural companies sell poor cotton farmers pesticides that have been banned in the west for decades due to their proven carcinogenic properties. They spray massive amounts, without any protective gear, in clouds that billow over not only the cotton, but themselves and often their nearby homes and families.

In Uzbekistan, children are bused from school to the cotton fields during the harvest to provide child slave labor. Their hands are small enough to navigate the prickly plants and pick only the buds.

It takes 12 cups of water to produce one cotton bud and the Aral Sea is being drained to irrigate the fields. Port towns now sit miles from the water, boats lying on dry cracked earth amidst carcinogenic dust clouds.

In Africa, cotton farmers carry pounds of their harvest miles to sell in trading towns, only to find that the cotton is not worth the price they paid to grow it because American cotton farmers are so heavily subsidized by the government that the market is flooded.

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