bhaktimalas' Profile

About

I started making japa malas a few years ago, mainly because I could never find a mala that I really liked. A lot of the malas you find around are either poorly made, or hard to use, or just don't look very good. And since a mala, when properly used and cared for, is an important part of a spiritual practice, it should be of the highest quality and treated with respect.

So I started making malas for myself and a few close friends, but more and more people started asking for them. So I decided to give it a go and started selling them.

I hope you find the mala you've always been looking for!


ABOUT JAPA:
Japa is a form of yogic meditation. It is the practice of repeating a mantra or a prayer over and over, using a mala to keep count. The purpose of…

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  • Male
  • Born on July 9
  • Joined January 15, 2009

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About

I started making japa malas a few years ago, mainly because I could never find a mala that I really liked. A lot of the malas you find around are either poorly made, or hard to use, or just don't look very good. And since a mala, when properly used and cared for, is an important part of a spiritual practice, it should be of the highest quality and treated with respect.

So I started making malas for myself and a few close friends, but more and more people started asking for them. So I decided to give it a go and started selling them.

I hope you find the mala you've always been looking for!


ABOUT JAPA:
Japa is a form of yogic meditation. It is the practice of repeating a mantra or a prayer over and over, using a mala to keep count. The purpose of japa is to quiet the random wanderings of the mind, and to learn to focus the mind on Spirit.

Traditionally, proper japa is done holding the mala in the right hand between the middle finger and the thumb. The mala should never be touched by the index finger, because that finger is most closely associated with the sense of "I" and "me", the Ego. The mala is made up of 108 beads (or a divisor of 108 such as 54, 36 or 27), plus a central bead which is called the head bead, the guru bead, or the meru bead. Starting by holding one of the beads adjacent to the head bead, the mantra is recited. Then the thumb pushes the mala and holds the second bead. The mantra is thus repeated once per bead all the way around the mala. When the end of the mala is reached, it is important not to cross over the head bead, but rather to turn the mala around and go back in the other direction.

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