Rachelle Mechenbier's Profile

About

The purpose of art is not a rarified, intellectual distillate –it is life, intensified, brilliant life. –Alain Arias-Misson

I make art that reflects the interplay between my mind, my body, and the world around me and that feels good to me. I wrote this sentence 8 years ago during my senior year in college, and it holds completely true today. A lot of my progress in art, as in my life, has been through trusting myself (mind and body) and exploring the world around and inside of me.
What I am trying to do with my work is to set up a space of full freedom for myself to make whatever it is I need to make next. In that space I can take what I have learned about art, what I want to know, how I feel, what I see, and the character of the materials themselves and explore. Discouragement is waiting for artists in the mouths of teachers, professors, and family members just as it is for…

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  • Female
  • Born on December 30
  • Joined September 28, 2010

Favorite materials

India ink, acrylic paint, mixed media, oil pastel, charcoal, recycled materials, lace, fabric, oil paint, hope

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About

The purpose of art is not a rarified, intellectual distillate –it is life, intensified, brilliant life. –Alain Arias-Misson

I make art that reflects the interplay between my mind, my body, and the world around me and that feels good to me. I wrote this sentence 8 years ago during my senior year in college, and it holds completely true today. A lot of my progress in art, as in my life, has been through trusting myself (mind and body) and exploring the world around and inside of me.
What I am trying to do with my work is to set up a space of full freedom for myself to make whatever it is I need to make next. In that space I can take what I have learned about art, what I want to know, how I feel, what I see, and the character of the materials themselves and explore. Discouragement is waiting for artists in the mouths of teachers, professors, and family members just as it is for the clients I see in my counseling office. I was told in art school that I needed to have less things going on when I first spoke about all the ideas I had for a painting. That advice cost me a good 2 years lost of not exploring what I really wanted to accomplish. I saw an amazing Rauschenberg several years after that incident and recognized at once how important it is to do what you feel like doing in your art. I can’t imagine what would have happened if he had listened to others’ criticism of his style instead of following his idea of where he needed to go. I bolster myself frequently with the thought of the umbrella he painted into one of the first paintings of his that I saw. If a painting needs an umbrella, then it needs an umbrella. As a therapist who uses art with kids and adults in the course of their therapy, I find that I am able to be very present with clients when we are making art together. I give them a space to explore whatever they need to during the time we are working. When I am doing just talk therapy, I struggle because I often want to know what is happening or what I need to be doing. However, the grace I have found through exploring material and my own art making process has allowed me to set aside a great deal of that anxiety when they are making art.

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