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Bruce Arlen Wasserman's Profile

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Artist Bio
Bruce Arlen Wasserman trained as a potter under Montana potter Dave McMasters. After his time with Dave and with a good foundation in functional ware, Bruce studied at Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass, Colorado, where he worked primarily in wood fired stoneware, under the tutelage of Jason Hess and Doug Casebeer. Bruce also credits Tim Smith as an insightful influence on his ceramic approach at that time.

His exposure at Anderson Ranch to traditional Japanese pottery was facilitated through interactions and observation of national living treasure potter Nakazato Takashi. This time informed Bruce's ceramic aesthetic, in large part effecting the unique and easy functional aesthetic his work displays today.

In 2007, Bruce helped build and has subsequently participated in many firings of a wood fired train kiln at the Red…

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  • Joined August 21, 2009

Favorite materials

In stoneware and porcelain, I am attracted to the interaction of Shino glazes with the clay body in reduction, but I admit to a fondness for copper based glazes as well, My previous life as a blacksmith and wood turner inform my designs and inspire me to exploit the natural appeal of my works in clay

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About

Artist Bio
Bruce Arlen Wasserman trained as a potter under Montana potter Dave McMasters. After his time with Dave and with a good foundation in functional ware, Bruce studied at Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass, Colorado, where he worked primarily in wood fired stoneware, under the tutelage of Jason Hess and Doug Casebeer. Bruce also credits Tim Smith as an insightful influence on his ceramic approach at that time.

His exposure at Anderson Ranch to traditional Japanese pottery was facilitated through interactions and observation of national living treasure potter Nakazato Takashi. This time informed Bruce's ceramic aesthetic, in large part effecting the unique and easy functional aesthetic his work displays today.

In 2007, Bruce helped build and has subsequently participated in many firings of a wood fired train kiln at the Red Lodge Clay Center in Red Lodge, Montana. Bruce creates his unique works today in a studio he built by hand in Cody, Wyoming, where he fires his stoneware and porcelain pieces.

With a background as a trained blacksmith and an accomplished woodturner, Bruce often is found combining concepts and even media in his pursuit of his ceramic aesthetic.

Artist Statement
I am fascinated by the ability of clay to flow and form from a seemingly lifeless lump in my hands to my expression of a vantage point and microcosmic world view. All this happens as the potters wheel spins quietly in front of me and my fingers press, compress, expand and deform the clay into a shape reflecting its ultimate purpose.
Each line and every deformation of the clay body expresses meaning for me. The piece as a whole has a synergy that invites the ceramic-o-phile to participate in its unique twist on life. A cup becomes more than just an object of utility—it reaches out as my personal expression.
I design my objects to enhance the experience of the end user. Each sip from a cup expresses a potential that the clay can continue to fulfill its purpose in informing the drinker’s day. I believe it enables a transformation to take place—a routine act, sipping tea, becomes a tea ceremony of one’s own creation. The created object opens the door to a venue that would otherwise be missed in the hustle and bustle of everyday life. It invites a quietness and the potential for reflection which has been lost in the sea of mass-produced sameness prevalent in today’s culture.
Because my creative training and experience has been multifaceted, I find myself drawing from the reservoir which springs from my background of working in iron and wood. I believe my designs in clay ultimately are informed by my early life as a blacksmith and my continued exploration of the working of iron and wood and their interactions.

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