Cindy's Profile

About

Hi there! I've been collecting vintage textiles for a while now - I was hooked when I got my first vintage chenille bedspread. In my shop you will find feed sack pillows, crocheted throws, vintage chenille bedspreads and linens and whatever catches my eye on shopping trips.

I take a lot of time finding just the right spreads and linens and lovingly prepare them for their new home - they are fabulous - mostly from the 40s/50s. The items that I craft are made with love and care - maybe you will find something that suits your fancy! Thanks for stopping by :-)! Cindy

Thanks to Country Living Magazine, SheKnows, Apartment Therapy, Southern Weddings Magazine, Folk Magazine On-Line, San Francisco Girl by Bay, Real Living Magazine, Flea Market Style Magazine, One Kings Lane and all the other wonderful bloggers and publications showcasing my…

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  • Born on March 13
  • Joined July 6, 2007

Favorite materials

Vintage Grainsacks, Ticking, Feather Pillows, Linen, Barkcloth, Chenille

Shop

catnapcottage
Chenille Bedspreads Grainsack Pillows...

About

Hi there! I've been collecting vintage textiles for a while now - I was hooked when I got my first vintage chenille bedspread. In my shop you will find feed sack pillows, crocheted throws, vintage chenille bedspreads and linens and whatever catches my eye on shopping trips.

I take a lot of time finding just the right spreads and linens and lovingly prepare them for their new home - they are fabulous - mostly from the 40s/50s. The items that I craft are made with love and care - maybe you will find something that suits your fancy! Thanks for stopping by :-)! Cindy

Thanks to Country Living Magazine, SheKnows, Apartment Therapy, Southern Weddings Magazine, Folk Magazine On-Line, San Francisco Girl by Bay, Real Living Magazine, Flea Market Style Magazine, One Kings Lane and all the other wonderful bloggers and publications showcasing my wares.

You can also find me here:

♥Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/#!/pages/The-CatNap-Cottage/106074549427394?ref=ts
♥Twitter: http://twitter.com/catnapcottage
♥Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/catnapcottage/

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MINI HISTORY OF "CHENILLE ROW" aka "PEACOCK ALLEY"

In the 1930s, U.S. 41 in northwest Georgia was the most colorful place in the world.

At least that's what you'd have thought at a tender age, your nose pressed to the car window during a long day's drive. Passing through a little town called Dalton - later to be known for its carpet industry - your eyes would have landed on the infant stages of that industry: vibrantly adorned clotheslines that stretched through an area known as "Peacock Alley."

Candy-colored chenille bedspreads and robes, small rugs and pillows burst with intricate designs of flowers and football players, rocket ships and, the most popular of designs, peacocks. Beckoning passers-by with their glorious color, they billowed in the breeze, selling for $3 to $5.
(written by Julie Phillips,staff writer,Athens newspaper)

Here is the story of how chenille got started in the 1940s with the Bandy Family and their chenille tufting factory.... http://www.kennesaw.edu/research/crhc/articles/bandy.html
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MINI HISTORY OF BARKCLOTH

In the late 1930s American designers and weavers introduced their version of barkcloth to the world. Their designs reflected what was popular in décor at the time. Florals, and especially tropicals were the earliest motifs. By the 1940s, barkcloth was one of the most common fabrics in the home. It was pretty much made to be indestructible. It was used to cover furniture, make window treatments and other home and personal accessories. (Next time you watch an old movie, look at the draperies in the background.) The vat dyes came first, then the screen prints. Just about any design imaginable was available... tropicals, leaves, birds, romantic scenes from far away countries, old fashioned scenes, wild abstract shapes, children's prints, animals, subtle and delicate florals...All in beautiful vivid colors cheering up our nation during and after the war.

During the 1950s, barkcloth was absolutely indispensable! By the 1960s, more and more manmade fibers were used in décor items and in the early 1970s barkcloth quickly disappeared. There has been a rise in interest and reproductions have been made, but they do not hold a candle to the original vintage designs and textures.

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