Meg Frampton's Profile

About

Before I picked up a jeweler's torch or my first rainbow chunks of polymer clay, I wielded an electric guitar as my weapon of choice. I toured all over the country and the world for six wonderful years with my little sister and three of my best friends. (Now I'm proud to call one of them "boyfriend".) I consider the five of us extremely lucky and blessed to have recorded records with some of our dream producers, for signing record deals to two different labels that I've been dying to be noticed by since I first picked up a guitar.

After playing in hundreds of bars, clubs, and even arenas during our last year, I found myself compelled to dip my toes into other creative waters, to test out other artistic roads.

I never planned to be a jeweler. To tell you the truth, (I'm not even sure if I should admit this on my site), I didn't ever wear much jewelry aside…

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  • Female
  • Born on April 3
  • Joined December 15, 2010

Favorite materials

polymer clay, antique copper, vintage watch parts, unique beads, interesting findings

About

Before I picked up a jeweler's torch or my first rainbow chunks of polymer clay, I wielded an electric guitar as my weapon of choice. I toured all over the country and the world for six wonderful years with my little sister and three of my best friends. (Now I'm proud to call one of them "boyfriend".) I consider the five of us extremely lucky and blessed to have recorded records with some of our dream producers, for signing record deals to two different labels that I've been dying to be noticed by since I first picked up a guitar.

After playing in hundreds of bars, clubs, and even arenas during our last year, I found myself compelled to dip my toes into other creative waters, to test out other artistic roads.

I never planned to be a jeweler. To tell you the truth, (I'm not even sure if I should admit this on my site), I didn't ever wear much jewelry aside from a very expensive and treasured diamond ring given to me as a gift by my boss when I told her through tears and hugs after work one day that I had to quite my job, because I needed to pursue music. (Although now, I look at jewelry through a very spiritual perspective. It's not just rings, and necklaces, and bracelets to me after I dreamed it up and created it with my own two hands. It's art I can share!)

I suppose rather than discovering jewelry design, jewelry design discovered me, just like music did years ago.

Our band had just finished tour. I spent a couple weeks being lazy, cleaning suitcases of sweaty clothes, and figuring out how to spend a day without having to plan my meals around sound checks or long van drives. You can only catch up on so much "Friends" and "Sex and The City" episodes before you start to become a little restless.

At the time, I lived in Austin. Austin is one of those cities with an interesting house, restaurant, or boutique shop on every corner. I explored the east side on a sunny afternoon, stopping by my favorite sandwich shop to sip on some Jasmine tea and nibble on apricot shortbread cookies. (Oh god, how I miss those cookies!)

I happened to stumble upon a crazy looking house with what appeared to be metal sculptures strewn about the front yard and on the patio in between exotic, wild house plants dangling from the porch ceiling. The night had just begun to lay it's cloak across the shoulders of the world, so I couldn't see very clearly. I did see laughing women clinking glasses of wine juxtaposed with unexpected flashes of blue flame lighting up the windows of the house. The door stood open, so I wandered in. (I've been known to be the kind of person to just wander around places. It used to drive my sister crazy when we toured, how I'd go off alone, discovering the bones and meat of new cities by myself. I can't help it.)

The insides of the house gave me the same breathtaking experience that I feel walking into beautiful old libraries or music studios filled with decades of history. Metal tools lay on old wooden tables with all sorts of foreign mechanical equipment. You would expect to see a bunch of old men shooting shots of whiskey and shouting to over each other with old danes resting at their feet in such an environment, but I saw artsy, chatty women dressed in colorful long skirts and shawls, with hanging beads around their necks, and curly hair framing their vibrant, glowing faces.

I wanted in, whatever this was!

That week, I signed up for three classes at Creative Side Jewelry, and I quickly became an apprentice to the notorious Courtney Grey, master metalsmith. l studied all of her techniques. I learned all the safety procedures of the studio, and only broke the rules when I fancied breaking the rules. ( O.K. So I never followed the rules.) I learned how how to set a diamond (we used cubic zirconia instead of diamonds, but I couldn't tell the difference at that point.) I learned how to create a tree out of wax in order to cast more than one metal ring at a time.

During this time of intense-creative learning, I suffered from an unexpected heartbreak when my partner of four years pulled the plug, over the phone, on our long distance relationship of four years. These women who I had only know for a short time, became not just my teachers and my mentors, but my mothers and my sisters, my safe place.

I think, maybe, because of that experience, jewelry design took on a more emotional meaning for me. It wasn't just a necklace I made or a ring or a pendant. It was the people who cared about me, who helped me through that difficult time, who I never would have met, if I didn't take a chance and walk into that house that first night with the laughter and the blue flame.

It's funny, all the similarities between making and designing jewelry and being a songwriter/musician. Aside from the pure joy and thrill of creation within both of these crafts is the experience of sharing art with other people, people I may not even know.

In the band I used to play in we received letters all the time that said things like, "Your music kept me from killing myself," or " Without the song ______, I would have never made it though my parent's divorce." These letters surprised and left me in awe and helped me to understood the power of art at a very young age.

And even now, I receive emails from people who own my jewelry that say, "Stoked to finally get my hands on a Chandler! He'll be going on an adventure with me when I deploy in a few weeks! Been a fan of all of your music projects from day one! Thanks!:) - Theodore" or "I received my dragons, today.. They are GORGEOUS!... I luv U!.. :-) you so, made a military momma's day!.. :-P Glen D."

How could I not love what I do after receiving emails such as these? Creating art in one form or another is, and will always be, the thing that makes me feel most alive.

And I feel very lucky to have found that and will hold onto it always.

Honestly,
Meg

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