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Darrien Segal's Profile

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“All art is but imitation of nature”
Seneca (c 4B.C. -A.D. 65)

I spent the first decade of my life on a boat. I now feel very removed from the child I was, sailing around the world before the age of ten. I use nautical and natural objects in my work, and it reminds me of my childhood. I find things like shells and starfish on the beaches of Southwest Florida, as well as seeds and pods from Rhode Island. As I become more aware of the natural world around me, I begin to see the incredible symmetry and perfection that exists in nature. There is an abundance of fascinating things all around, if one only takes the time to really look.

Anything that has texture and substance attracts my attention. I cast the actual objects I find, rather than making wax models of them. I then add the components I need for a particular piece and then make a mold…

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  • Female
  • Born on May 26
  • Joined November 7, 2008

Favorite materials

sterling silver, gold, 14k gold, freshwater white pearls, freshwater pink pearls, freshwater black pearls, garnets, amethysts, pearls

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About

“All art is but imitation of nature”
Seneca (c 4B.C. -A.D. 65)

I spent the first decade of my life on a boat. I now feel very removed from the child I was, sailing around the world before the age of ten. I use nautical and natural objects in my work, and it reminds me of my childhood. I find things like shells and starfish on the beaches of Southwest Florida, as well as seeds and pods from Rhode Island. As I become more aware of the natural world around me, I begin to see the incredible symmetry and perfection that exists in nature. There is an abundance of fascinating things all around, if one only takes the time to really look.

Anything that has texture and substance attracts my attention. I cast the actual objects I find, rather than making wax models of them. I then add the components I need for a particular piece and then make a mold of it and cast that. The challenge is transforming these things into wearable and comfortable jewelry. Soft, fine petals become prickly points when converted into silver and gold. I attempt to remove these sharp elements without losing the details and subtleties that connect the jewelry to the natural world from which it came.

I was first introduced to jewelry making in high school taking all the classes that were offered and then creating an independent study when there were no more classes. I hadn't planned to major in jewelry at the Rhode Island School of Design because I thought I needed something 'sellable' even though I used metal and wire throughout my freshman foundation year. I declared graphic design and then was told by an upperclassman that if I didn't love what I did I would never be great at it. The next day I ran around getting signatures on forms to switch my major and started my sophomore year as a jewelry major. And the rest as they say is history.

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