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Debra Bacianga's Profile

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Debra started making animals from playdough when she was eight years old, forming and drying them on the heater vent at home. Her goal, as a child, was to make a model of each and every dog breed recognized by the American Kennel Club. She made about thirty, representing the breeds of dogs that interested her the most.
As she grew up, there was no doubt where her passion lay- she was going to be an artist. Her love of art anchored her, and with the strength of will so evident in her personality, she refused to consider anything else. She applied to the Tyler School of Art (a branch of Temple University). It was Tyler or nothing. Debra jokes about how lucky it was that Tyler accepted her as she had no back-up plan.
Graduation led to a fortunate apprenticeship with Philadelphia sculptor Caesar Rufo. Working with Rufo on Olympic medallions, she learned the low bas-relief technique (used in the…

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  • Female
  • Born on July 27
  • Joined January 25, 2009

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About

Debra started making animals from playdough when she was eight years old, forming and drying them on the heater vent at home. Her goal, as a child, was to make a model of each and every dog breed recognized by the American Kennel Club. She made about thirty, representing the breeds of dogs that interested her the most.
As she grew up, there was no doubt where her passion lay- she was going to be an artist. Her love of art anchored her, and with the strength of will so evident in her personality, she refused to consider anything else. She applied to the Tyler School of Art (a branch of Temple University). It was Tyler or nothing. Debra jokes about how lucky it was that Tyler accepted her as she had no back-up plan.
Graduation led to a fortunate apprenticeship with Philadelphia sculptor Caesar Rufo. Working with Rufo on Olympic medallions, she learned the low bas-relief technique (used in the making of coins) that she still incorporates in her work. Debra was attracted to the amount of detail which could fit into small spaces.
From there she became an artist-in-residence at the University of Pennsylvania. She found time to experiment with her own sculpting, ceramics, and painting while assisting students with their projects.
Debra moved to Seattle fifteen years ago and has her own private studio. She has produced work used as trophies in many dog shows throughout the Nation and has shown her sculptures in various shows, including the recent "Red" show in Baltimore. She also sells her work at the Seward Park Art Studio's Christmas shows, and the Noble Horse Gallery in Pioneer Square. Her current sculptures have as their subject matter "Women on Horseback" in which the horse is used as a metaphor for the direction that the women's lives are taking.

To view fine art objects from Debra’s studio click here: http://www.etsy.com/shop/debrabacianga

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