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About

FairyRingMushroom Co.
Lonnie Murphy and Loren Parlee – Artists
Medium: Wood, Oil Paint, Clay, Glaze

Fairy Ring Mushrooms received their name because of the peculiar way they grow, in large circles or rings. Legend told that fairies gathered in rings on summer’s eves and that if one waited quietly they may catch a glimpse.

In their early years Loren and Lonnie did a lot of sketching in pencil and, while still teenagers, were taught to oil paint by their dad. At age 11 they worked with their grandfather building redwood Meissner nursery baskets. Their father, a carpenter by trade, also did woodwork at home. Loren and Lonnie would creep into the garage to watch and, while their father was at work, would quietly explore the tools and woods. With their father and grandfather helping, they would construct various small…

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  • Female
  • Born on June 26
  • Joined February 8, 2009

Favorite materials

Exotic hardwoods, ceramic clays, oil paint

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About

FairyRingMushroom Co.
Lonnie Murphy and Loren Parlee – Artists
Medium: Wood, Oil Paint, Clay, Glaze

Fairy Ring Mushrooms received their name because of the peculiar way they grow, in large circles or rings. Legend told that fairies gathered in rings on summer’s eves and that if one waited quietly they may catch a glimpse.

In their early years Loren and Lonnie did a lot of sketching in pencil and, while still teenagers, were taught to oil paint by their dad. At age 11 they worked with their grandfather building redwood Meissner nursery baskets. Their father, a carpenter by trade, also did woodwork at home. Loren and Lonnie would creep into the garage to watch and, while their father was at work, would quietly explore the tools and woods. With their father and grandfather helping, they would construct various small wooden items. The wonderful aroma of wood from youth still brings inspiration to them.

In adulthood, Loren built furniture, selling bookcases hutches and other hardwood furnishings. She began developing her woodcarving skills by age 19, primarily doing recess carving in hardwoods to incorporate into her custom furniture. Woodwork, including woodcarving, provided Loren with a balance between art and function. For a time, while living on an Italian Mediterranean island, Loren’s interest shifted back to oil painting. She painted and sold many original pieces, inspired by the beautiful local area. Along with oil painting, Loren experimented with other art mediums such as acrylic, stained glass, and clay.

Lonnie received formal art and design training at various colleges. She has painted most of her life, with a special interest in oil and gouache mediums. In 2003, she began painting murals in the Sacramento area. One of her favorite subjects for her paintings is the mushroom. Her beautiful refined style of painting and design offer a sense of grace and elegance. This refined style found in Lonnie’s paintings carried over to her woodwork as she produced a variety of beautiful hardwood pieces, including bookshelves, entertainment centers, dressers and church furnishings.

Loren and Lonnie’s interest in making flutes developed in 2005. Initially, Loren had an interest in purchasing a Native American Style drum. Later, she decided to make one. This led to Lonnie and Loren making many more drums. The natural next step was to add their love of oil painting to these hand held drums by painting symbols; the deer, the lynx, the turtle, or other themes on the drums.

After attending various Native American events Loren and Lonnie were drawn to the Native American Style flute and made their first flute in 2005, with chisels, wood planes - and a lot of experimentation.

The sisters pursued research of the flute through various readings (particularly the works of Lew Paxton Price, and the writers of NAFlutomat), talking with other flute makers, flute players, and general flute enthusiasts. These resources have provided an invaluable understanding of the flute.

In 2007, their increasing interest in various sound chambers were further explored. The vessel flute, or ocarina, became a fascinating exploration and they enthusiastically began to make wood and clay ocarinas. What a joy.

To date, they have made over 720 flutes, 115 wood ocarinas and 360 ceramic ocarinas. These include Pentatonic, Diatonic and Chromatic tunings, lending these various instruments to a wide range of world music.

Their future is leading them to add additional tunings and cultural themes to their flutes and ocarinas.

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