Brooke Wilton's Profile

About

I have never been a fashionista. I have been an artist, musician, and techie guy living in Austin Texas most of my life, with my own sense of style far from the usual trends.

My first experience making my own clothing was in my early teens, when me and some friends silk-screened our own gear. Hey, It was the early 80's! Our discovery of Nu Wave had pre-dated all the suburban clothing stores in our area, so armed with the DIY ethos of Punk, we confidently made day-glow stripes on skinny ties, bleeding bullet-holes in t-shirts, and ironically declared that Brian Eno sucked! We took every opportunity to boldly display our pantheon of new anti-heroes, like David Bowie and Iggy Pop.

By the late 80's, I had gone back in time to discover the great music from the 60's. In and out of college, I tie-dyed shirts, sometimes with my own silk-screened images, and…

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  • Male
  • Joined September 27, 2010

Favorite materials

cotton, hemp

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flamelessshirt
Flameless Shirt

About

I have never been a fashionista. I have been an artist, musician, and techie guy living in Austin Texas most of my life, with my own sense of style far from the usual trends.

My first experience making my own clothing was in my early teens, when me and some friends silk-screened our own gear. Hey, It was the early 80's! Our discovery of Nu Wave had pre-dated all the suburban clothing stores in our area, so armed with the DIY ethos of Punk, we confidently made day-glow stripes on skinny ties, bleeding bullet-holes in t-shirts, and ironically declared that Brian Eno sucked! We took every opportunity to boldly display our pantheon of new anti-heroes, like David Bowie and Iggy Pop.

By the late 80's, I had gone back in time to discover the great music from the 60's. In and out of college, I tie-dyed shirts, sometimes with my own silk-screened images, and sometimes I even managed to fuel tours to see the Grateful Dead with them. I called my company Shroud of Terrapin.

In the 90's and early 00's I had a few different band projects, but even though I was creating art and photography for them, I never got around to making any T-shirts for some reason. I think it had to do with being out-voted for funding. After ditching playing bands so that I would no longer be out-voted for funding, I went back to making visual art. After a while, I decided to put some of my creations on T-shirts in my quest to make my work more utilitarian and accessible.

Then a few years ago, a seamstress friend offered to make me some camp style shirts because I had embraced the cut but was having trouble finding any patterns I liked. She introduced me to the world of retail fabric, and I was surprised by the variation and killer styles of the many featured textiles; things you could not find at any retail-clothing store. So after making a couple of great new shirts, I found I liked the custom ones so much that I started making a lot more, and began to alter the style of shirt to compliment the original flair of the fabrics I found.

Clothing design then became a new medium of art for me to explore, so I started to hunt down rare fabric to experiment with, to see what looked great in this new format. In doing so, I found I was drawn to louder and wilder designs, rarely relying on traditional floral or classic elements for shirts of this style. What was intended for quilters to use in small squares for their mosaics became whole shirts for me. I matched buttons to augment the fabrics to maximum effect, combining these into new compositions.

It became empowering for me to wear these original designs and I found I had a renewed sense of confidence when wearing them. They provided a new kind of uniform for recreation like no other clothing I had or have worn since. As more and more people noticed and complimented these designs, eventually offering to buy them, I decided I should start making copies of my most successful designs for others to enjoy. Now I have also begun to design my own fabrics as well.

And here's where Rock 'n Roll came in: Some of my favorite albums growing up (Bowie's Ziggy Stardust, for instance) had an additional note on them to ensure you would listen to them properly to get the most out of the experience. A simple message really, but for me it has become a maxim to live by, and an attitude I have endeavored to infuse into these fine shirts. And so I urge you to please PLAY LOUD!

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