folktale's Profile

About

My blog & flickr:

http://folktalefibers.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/folktalefibers/

My yarn is in a book! "Knit One, Embellish Too: Hats, Mittens, and Scarves With a Twist" by Cosette Cornelius-Bates (aka http://cosyknitsliterally.etsy.com ). Check out pages 88 & 100 for a sweet bonnet pattern and some lovely stripey mittens knit with my handspun yarn.

I've loved working with fiber for most of my life. I learned to crochet and sew at a young age, and later on I taught myself how to knit and then to spin on both a drop spindle and wheel. I love to process my own fiber from raw wool, and am always amazed by the sometimes magical transformation from fiber to yarn.

I've begun to be more…

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  • Born on April 8
  • Joined October 30, 2007

Favorite materials

local wool, organic cotton, mohair, sparkle, recycled fibers, wheel, dye

Shop

folktale
animal-friendly handspun yarn & fiber

About

My blog & flickr:

http://folktalefibers.blogspot.com/

http://www.flickr.com/photos/folktalefibers/

My yarn is in a book! "Knit One, Embellish Too: Hats, Mittens, and Scarves With a Twist" by Cosette Cornelius-Bates (aka http://cosyknitsliterally.etsy.com ). Check out pages 88 & 100 for a sweet bonnet pattern and some lovely stripey mittens knit with my handspun yarn.

I've loved working with fiber for most of my life. I learned to crochet and sew at a young age, and later on I taught myself how to knit and then to spin on both a drop spindle and wheel. I love to process my own fiber from raw wool, and am always amazed by the sometimes magical transformation from fiber to yarn.

I've begun to be more and more conscious about the fibers I use in my yarns. I currently avoid most silk (except for recycled sari silk threads and mill end/recycled silk) and most commercially processed wool. I try to buy as much wool from small local farms as possible -local sheep & wool festivals are my best friend! I like supporting small local businesses, and when I buy directly from the farmers, they get a much fairer price for their wool than if they sold it to a large company. Plus it allows me to control exactly what goes into my fiber and keep the entire process eco-friendly - most of the wool and mohair that I use in my yarns I get raw, right off the animal, and I wash, dye, and card it myself.

My processed Falkland/merino cross wool top comes from the DHF farm in the Falkland islands. They don't use any herbicides, pesticides, dips, footbaths or regular injections on their sheep, and no bleach or other chemicals in the processing of the wool - so it is, according to them, some of the purest, cleanest wool you will find on the planet. It's also extremely soft and fine, with the loftiness of merino.

I also use mill end fibers, which are leftovers from large spinning mills. They end up with lots of 'waste' fibers that don't make it all the way through the carding & spinning process that would otherwise be thrown out if they didn't sell them to handspinners. The fibers are top-quality, they just tend to take more prep time as they often need to be re-carded.

I've discovered the joys of spinning plant fibers as well - organic cotton (I only buy organic cotton, due to the crazy amounts of pesticides used on conventional cotton), recycled bamboo, tencel, and hemp are my current favorites. I plan on spinning plenty of veggie yarns. They take more time to spin, and the fibers can be costly, but I enjoy providing wool-free options for those with allergies or vegan lifestyles.

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