Jan Cameron's Profile

About

Welcome to my shop. I started my journey with clay in 1994, taking a class at our local junior college. All my work was done on the potter's wheel. Then in 1998 my daughter invited me to visit her for a couple of weeks while she was working on her PhD. dissertation on the Jicarilla Apache tribe. She was staying with Felipe Ortega, a master at his craft, as his apprentice. She thought it would be a great experience I would appreciate . I not only learned the Jicarilla Apache tradition of making pots. I also learned the importance of this clay to their people. All my pots are hand coiled, water scraped, sanded and polished with a slip that has larger flakes of mica in it.

The rich micaceous clay is dug directly from deposits in the Sangre de Cristos Mountains of northern New Mexico and hand processed. The fabric of this clay is more than 80% mica and finished vessels glitter like…

Read more

  • Female
  • Born on December 26
  • Joined August 8, 2011

Favorite materials

Micaceous clay

Shop

jansmicaceouspottery
All that Glitters

About

Welcome to my shop. I started my journey with clay in 1994, taking a class at our local junior college. All my work was done on the potter's wheel. Then in 1998 my daughter invited me to visit her for a couple of weeks while she was working on her PhD. dissertation on the Jicarilla Apache tribe. She was staying with Felipe Ortega, a master at his craft, as his apprentice. She thought it would be a great experience I would appreciate . I not only learned the Jicarilla Apache tradition of making pots. I also learned the importance of this clay to their people. All my pots are hand coiled, water scraped, sanded and polished with a slip that has larger flakes of mica in it.

The rich micaceous clay is dug directly from deposits in the Sangre de Cristos Mountains of northern New Mexico and hand processed. The fabric of this clay is more than 80% mica and finished vessels glitter like gold. The stunning beauty of micaceous pottery is matched only by its functionality. For over 800 years, micaceous vessels have adorned the adobe kitchens of New Mexico and are still used today to slow cook beans, chilies, and meat with delightful results.

You can visit my web site: http://www.janmica.com for more information.

I hope you enjoy these vessels as much as I enjoy making them.

Thanks for visiting my shop.

Jan

Unfollow username?

Are you sure you want to stop following this person?