Kira Call's Profile

About

I've been making functional pottery since 2010. For the last couple of years, I've been focusing on unique hand built designs not made using the potters wheel. My work usually features quiet botanical designs or brightly colored floral patterns, but I also use abstract designs and patterns like stripes, herringbone, and my pebble design. I also experiment with airbrush techniques and foam stencils.
In my studio, I believe in mixing all of my clay and glazes from raw materials as opposed to using commercial clay and glazes with mystery recipes. I find it easier to make the glazes smoother and more food safe when I know every ingredient going into it-- think of it like organic food, or like cooking from scratch to make the ingredient list shorter but better.
I studied ceramics at Utah State University in Logan Utah with an amazing group of professors and fellow artists. They taught me how to achieve what…

Read more

  • Female
  • Born on April 10
  • Joined June 19, 2012

Favorite materials

Porcelain, underglazes, original formulated satin clear glaze, hemp fiber, candle making

Shop

KiraCallCeramics
Handmade rainbow pottery to brighten up...

About

I've been making functional pottery since 2010. For the last couple of years, I've been focusing on unique hand built designs not made using the potters wheel. My work usually features quiet botanical designs or brightly colored floral patterns, but I also use abstract designs and patterns like stripes, herringbone, and my pebble design. I also experiment with airbrush techniques and foam stencils.
In my studio, I believe in mixing all of my clay and glazes from raw materials as opposed to using commercial clay and glazes with mystery recipes. I find it easier to make the glazes smoother and more food safe when I know every ingredient going into it-- think of it like organic food, or like cooking from scratch to make the ingredient list shorter but better.
I studied ceramics at Utah State University in Logan Utah with an amazing group of professors and fellow artists. They taught me how to achieve what I want in my work using integral skills including making my own tools and firing kilns manually, like gas reduction, soda, salt, and wood kilns. I value what I learned there, and I intend to never let the skills I learned get rusty.
In my home studio, I own a small Skutt electric kiln, but I refuse to lower my temperatures to cone 6 or lower. You'd be surprised at the temperature capabilities of Skutts if you've never owned a new one (I fire to cone 7 with a 30 minute hold, but my clay and glazes look like they have been fired to cone 9 or 10). I mix all of my porcelain clay by using a drill and a 5 gallon bucket. I mix my glazes using a small digital cooking scale. I used to be afraid that I wouldn't be able to continue doing ceramics without owning a shed or a big studio and a gas kiln. I've found that there is always a way when you love what you do.

Unfollow username?

Are you sure you want to stop following this person?