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Lisa Townley's Profile

About

To my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/lltownleyceramic

I grew up near Ann Arbor, Michigan. I set up my first home studio when I was 17, and took a few pottery classes in high school and college when I wasn't studying biology and bones. Both of my Grandmothers were ceramic artists and my first kiln was one that they both used and passed on to me.

I received my BS degree in Anthropology/Zoology in 1993, but instead of continuing right away to graduate school to study primates or genetics, I took some time off to work in an art gallery. One year later I moved to Denver, set up a pottery studio, and the next thing I knew, 17 years had gone by.

I apply custom-designed decals to my hand-thrown pieces. They then undergo a final firing in the kiln to permanently bond the decal to the surface…

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  • Female
  • Joined October 14, 2010

Shop

About

To my shop: http://www.etsy.com/shop/lltownleyceramic

I grew up near Ann Arbor, Michigan. I set up my first home studio when I was 17, and took a few pottery classes in high school and college when I wasn't studying biology and bones. Both of my Grandmothers were ceramic artists and my first kiln was one that they both used and passed on to me.

I received my BS degree in Anthropology/Zoology in 1993, but instead of continuing right away to graduate school to study primates or genetics, I took some time off to work in an art gallery. One year later I moved to Denver, set up a pottery studio, and the next thing I knew, 17 years had gone by.

I apply custom-designed decals to my hand-thrown pieces. They then undergo a final firing in the kiln to permanently bond the decal to the surface of the work. Recently I've started including some "upcycled" pieces from the thrift store, giving them a new life with my designs.

The current direction of my work melds pottery with the two things that have influenced much of my life: marketing and the sciences. Lately, I've been getting a lot of inspiration from science textbooks, stock market reports, and old clippings from medical journals.

"If you ever come across a piece of pottery that is perfect, you can be confident that it was produced by a machine. With pottery, you must seek near perfection. If you look carefully enough, you will always find some slight blemish that serves to remind us that the piece was crafted by a human hand."
-From "False Impression", by Jeffrey Archer

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