Peter Vizzusi's Profile

About

Magic Sands Studio
Classic glass-blowing techniques, beautiful forms, rich colors and textures. Each piece an improvised, unique vessel.
Hand-made in California by accomplished masters.
The look can transition from traditional to contemporary applications, complementing any space or style.

Blown Glass Process
Glassblowers have practiced their craft since Roman times; gathering the molten glass on the end of a hollow tube, inflating it, and shaping it into functional and beautiful vessels. Our process is essentially the same as that utilized in ancient glass-making, but also relates to the best of Murano, and to Tiffany’s “Favrille” from the turn of the 20th Century.

The recent “studio glass” movement has taken glass-making out of the factory and…

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  • Male
  • Born on July 10
  • Joined December 28, 2008

Favorite materials

raw glass batch, dense and richly colored glass bars, frits, and powders from Germany and New Zealand, the hardbrick, softbrick, castable refractory material, and beautiful crucibles of which I build my melt furnaces, and the beautiful Italian styled tools which have not changed for centuries

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About

Magic Sands Studio
Classic glass-blowing techniques, beautiful forms, rich colors and textures. Each piece an improvised, unique vessel.
Hand-made in California by accomplished masters.
The look can transition from traditional to contemporary applications, complementing any space or style.

Blown Glass Process
Glassblowers have practiced their craft since Roman times; gathering the molten glass on the end of a hollow tube, inflating it, and shaping it into functional and beautiful vessels. Our process is essentially the same as that utilized in ancient glass-making, but also relates to the best of Murano, and to Tiffany’s “Favrille” from the turn of the 20th Century.

The recent “studio glass” movement has taken glass-making out of the factory and returned it to the smaller, artisan-operated studio. By re-visiting the past, we’ve found a new direction. We modern “artigiani” inhabit the shifting space between the old and new world. While I respect the skill and traditions of the “maestri” of the past, I explore the improvisational possibilities of the molten glass. My best work is done when I’m seeing life, and the glass, through my own eyes and the choreography of production becomes nearly unconscious. Then, I’m able to coax the glass into shape, improvise forms, add rich color, texture and iridescence- the possibilities of which are already contained in the molten material.

My style
My recent vessels have evolved from one perfect, functional, ancient Roman vase in a museum in Padova. I trust my intuitive sense of form and color, then add silver and metallic oxides at extremely high temperatures to attain the ephemeral iridescent luster of ancient glass. I hope to invoke a sense of the archaeological, while creating decorative vessels of universal appeal- objects that manifest both the personality that formed them, and the amazing inherent properties of the molten glass. In my work there is texture and irregularity that give a depth and soul that modern manufacturing can’t replicate.

I’ve come to an understanding of, and continued respect for, the archetypal vessel, which, I believe, will always have a resonance in our unconscious.

Peter Vizzusi, Magic Sands

[A note on iridescent glass: iridescence is an optical phenomenon whereby hue changes with the angle from which a surface is viewed. In practical terms, we melt glass which contains a percentage of copper or silver (as did Tiffany and Steuben), blast the nearly-completed vessel with a reducing flame to bring the metal to the surface. This attains a surface of rich and complex colors, which may surprise and delight the viewer as it reveals itself in changing light conditions.]
LOVE, PV

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