Cheryl's Profile

About

Native of Vermont, I live just about as north as you can go before crossing the Canadian border. My husband and I raise Icelandic sheep and also make maple syrup on our 150 acre farm. Hard work, but plenty of accomplishments.

It's been an interesting journey from former software engineer to fiber artist and farmer. Now I wash, card, and spin my own wool from my own sheep and alpacas. My "co-workers" I call them. Okay. I admit it. Most of them are my "Lover-dubbers". They loved to be scratched and brushed, talked to, told how beautiful they are. In return, they give me so much more than fiber. They give me a way of life that a lot of people long for.

After a year with sheep, I took up spinning my own sheep's wool - a wonderful experience! It's not just another bag of roving for me, it's Gracie, or Venus, or Harry, or Ricardo…

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  • Female
  • Born on November 29
  • Joined December 17, 2008

Favorite materials

Icelandic sheep wool, alpaca, silk, bamboo, faux cashmere, angora bunny, merino, cormo

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mapleviewicelandics
Maple View Icelandics

About

Native of Vermont, I live just about as north as you can go before crossing the Canadian border. My husband and I raise Icelandic sheep and also make maple syrup on our 150 acre farm. Hard work, but plenty of accomplishments.

It's been an interesting journey from former software engineer to fiber artist and farmer. Now I wash, card, and spin my own wool from my own sheep and alpacas. My "co-workers" I call them. Okay. I admit it. Most of them are my "Lover-dubbers". They loved to be scratched and brushed, talked to, told how beautiful they are. In return, they give me so much more than fiber. They give me a way of life that a lot of people long for.

After a year with sheep, I took up spinning my own sheep's wool - a wonderful experience! It's not just another bag of roving for me, it's Gracie, or Venus, or Harry, or Ricardo. All of the natural colors of Icelandic sheep are striking. The next thing I learned is knitting. Socks are my favorite, but my current project is separating the Tog from the Thel on my drum carder, and spinning the Thel into laceweight yarn. I'm going to knit The Icelandic Shawl, a beautiful tribute to my lovely sheep. I love making fingerless mitts too. If only I had infinite hours to knit and spin. [sigh]

I love blending my Icelandic wool with all sorts of other fibers: alpaca (from our own goofy alpaca boys), merino, coopworth, cormo, silk, bamboo, - well, you name it! - making interesting and exciting combinations of colors and textures.

A lot of times I need an Icelandic break and try my hand at hand-painted roving from other breeds of sheep. I use Greener Shades dyes which are environmentally friendly. I love mixing the colors and thinking of the things I see around our farm that inspire me. Using the steam method to set the dye, I use 2 long stainless steel tables to lay out the wet roving. Then with all of the pots of dye pre-mixed in the center, I inject the dye into the roving using syringes w/o needles.

I'm just beginning to get items into my shop. I have an awful lot of stash (literally ROOMS full), from hand-spun yarn to raw fleeces, so if you are looking for something in particular, send me a note and I'll see what I have.

Check back often. Sugaring season begins mid-March and we'll be making more delicious maple syrup. Other mapley goodies too as the weather turns cooler.

Note about allergens: we have 3 kitties that rule the earth. Shadow, Charlie, and Alex. Shadow pretty much stays away from the fiber, but Charlie and Alex are a different story. I don't wet the yarn and roll it in cat hair before I ship it, but you may find a cat hair or two in your fiber. If you want more, please ask. I'm sure Charlie or Alex will oblige.

No dogs. No ferrets. No reptiles. No smokers. Just kitties.

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