Matt Hepler's Profile

About

See more of Matt's work on www.mhpotter.com

Bio: Matt Hepler took an introduction to ceramics course with Gary Baxter during last semester of his senior year at Houghton College in NY where he graduated with a B.A. in English Literature in 2008. He quickly realized that while he loves reading, he also loves making pots. Upon moving to Tulsa, OK to undertake a Master’s degree in English, he took lessons with and assisted in the studio of Ginger Tomshany. Now in Charlottesville, VA, Matt works in marketing for a local organization in order to finance his passion, ceramics. He prefers making functional forms and has had experience firing electric, gas, Raku, wood, and salt kilns.

Artist Statement: I’m fascinated by fingerprints, throwing lines, swirls, bumps, alterations, deformations, unglazed clay, and all the enduring…

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  • Male
  • Born on January 30
  • Joined May 13, 2010

Favorite materials

High fired ceramics

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About

See more of Matt's work on www.mhpotter.com

Bio: Matt Hepler took an introduction to ceramics course with Gary Baxter during last semester of his senior year at Houghton College in NY where he graduated with a B.A. in English Literature in 2008. He quickly realized that while he loves reading, he also loves making pots. Upon moving to Tulsa, OK to undertake a Master’s degree in English, he took lessons with and assisted in the studio of Ginger Tomshany. Now in Charlottesville, VA, Matt works in marketing for a local organization in order to finance his passion, ceramics. He prefers making functional forms and has had experience firing electric, gas, Raku, wood, and salt kilns.

Artist Statement: I’m fascinated by fingerprints, throwing lines, swirls, bumps, alterations, deformations, unglazed clay, and all the enduring remnants of the process visible in the final piece. I believe that something that is handmade should be handmade. It should speak of its individual history and proudly bear the marks of its creation. Each piece captures a moment—or really many moments—in time, and I’ve always believed that should be celebrated. Even when I eradicate or hide these marks, I try to make that a conscious decision. I always want my work to speak of intention, even if it is only readable by me as the creator. That said, the accomplice of intention is chance, and it plays perhaps the larger role in making each piece an expressive individual. I view the clay and glaze and kiln as much my partners in the creation of the final piece as they are tools.

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