Lois' Profile

About

I love felting, especially with luxurious ALPACA fiber! Besides creating original hats and scarves (and anything else I think up to keep the creative juices flowing), I also enjoy teaching others how to felt at our ranch, other farms & ranches, yarn shops and festivals. I began my adventure in felting after my husband and I bought our first alpacas in 2002. (We now have 30!) I've enjoyed crafts and needlework since my grade school days when I taught myself how to knit while on a three hour trip to my grandmother's house when I was about 10 years old. I still remember my feeling of accomplishment! I learned to sew in 4-H and in college I was a Home Economics major. My skills paved the way for a grand adventure designing, creating and "playing" with FELT! The possibilities are truly unlimited!

~Lois

A LITTLE HISTORY OF…

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  • Female
  • Born on April 7
  • Joined March 1, 2009

Favorite materials

Alpaca, silk, novelty yarn, material

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About

I love felting, especially with luxurious ALPACA fiber! Besides creating original hats and scarves (and anything else I think up to keep the creative juices flowing), I also enjoy teaching others how to felt at our ranch, other farms & ranches, yarn shops and festivals. I began my adventure in felting after my husband and I bought our first alpacas in 2002. (We now have 30!) I've enjoyed crafts and needlework since my grade school days when I taught myself how to knit while on a three hour trip to my grandmother's house when I was about 10 years old. I still remember my feeling of accomplishment! I learned to sew in 4-H and in college I was a Home Economics major. My skills paved the way for a grand adventure designing, creating and "playing" with FELT! The possibilities are truly unlimited!

~Lois

A LITTLE HISTORY OF THE ALPACA IN SOUTH AMERICA:
For the Incas the alpaca provided food, and more importantly fiber to make cloth. As cloth makers, the Inca Indian weavers made fabrics that outshone the fabrics of their later European conquerors. It is clearly recorded that the Incas wove woolen fabric from the fleece of the alpaca. The material thus woven was so soft that it was prized above almost everything else in the Incan Empire, including its gold and silver. To the Incas, status and wealth were counted in cloth, most of it coming from the alpaca. Armies were paid in cloth. Retreating armies burned warehouses full of cloth rather than allow a victorious army the spoils.
The Incas bestowed special religious significance on the alpaca, sacrificing an alpaca at sunrise, noon, and sunset to appease their pagan gods. Primarily because of this special religious significance, the Incas separated their alpacas from other forms of livestock and segregated the herds by color. After several generations, the Incas ascertained that the alpaca as a species is capable of producing some 22 separate and distinguishable colors. A highly regimented state-controlled textile industry aimed at ensuring fiber quality for consumption and trade. Records of flock sizes, including their color, sex and size were kept on quipus (knotted recording devices made of alpaca fiber) and used by the Incas. Apparently different kinds of fiber were distributed either partially or entirely according to social class. Commoners wore llama or guanaco derived clothing. High ranking officials and nobility wore gami (alpaca cloth). In all of human history there may have been nothing like the Incan obsession with fine cloth. Fabric, most often alpaca fabric, was the medium in which Incan society defined its essence.

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