Orthaevelve's Profile

About

When I was first starting out in paganism and my studies of shamanism and magic, I found very few pieces of jewelry or commercially made magical artifacts that were both well made and fairly priced. Getting pieces made cost astronomical amounts of money, so I ended up teaching myself to make the items I wanted. A few years later, several friends suggested that I sell some of my art on this site.

As of today, I am up to date on donations for all of my sold work, and have donated $50 to the Smithsonian Museum of the Native American from my sales since January 1, 2010. If you wish for proof of this donation, I will be glad to send a fax or email copy of the letter from the Smithsonian.

My artistic and business model is based first on using as much recycled or left over material as possible. The animal bones, teeth, claws and other…

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  • Female
  • Joined October 22, 2008

Favorite materials

precious and semi precious stones, found stones, silver, clay, herbs, bone, teeth, fur, skin, leather, claws, brass, porcelain

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About

When I was first starting out in paganism and my studies of shamanism and magic, I found very few pieces of jewelry or commercially made magical artifacts that were both well made and fairly priced. Getting pieces made cost astronomical amounts of money, so I ended up teaching myself to make the items I wanted. A few years later, several friends suggested that I sell some of my art on this site.

As of today, I am up to date on donations for all of my sold work, and have donated $50 to the Smithsonian Museum of the Native American from my sales since January 1, 2010. If you wish for proof of this donation, I will be glad to send a fax or email copy of the letter from the Smithsonian.

My artistic and business model is based first on using as much recycled or left over material as possible. The animal bones, teeth, claws and other items are leftovers of animals killed for food, leftovers of the fur trade from subsistence hunters or farming, animals found dead or road killed, antique pieces of taxidermy created before the ban on specific animals and their parts or fossils. I do not use trophy hunted items in my work knowingly. I also use chip beads, which are usually made from scrap lapidary material, recycled aluminum and copper, stones I mine, buy or trade for and then cut myself, wood from road cutting or construction areas and found objects. Lately I have added circuit board to some of my jewelry from discarded computers and phones.

The second part of my artistic model is deeply connected to the first. I try to display ordinary or found objects in such a way as to draw attention to their inherent beauty. We take for granted the loveliness of the pattern in wood or the innovation it takes to make pieces of a phone, or the luster of stones we find around us in creeks or woods. Or, we run the other way in fear from items that remind us that whether we like it or not, living things die. Bones are in some ways frightening in our culture, but I find them to be beautiful and representative of strength. Thus I try to use such items in my jewelry to remind viewers that beauty is all around us, we simply have to look to appreciate it.

I love custom work and invite my customers to send me pieces they want me to design or make for them.

As a side note, I use quite a bit of German silver which contains nickel instead of actual elemental silver. This will cause reactions in people allergic to nickel. They should not purchase those pieces containing nickel unless they can be worn in such a way that the metal does not touch their skin.

I also owe my thanks and inspiration to Robert Dancik, whose book "Amulets and Talismans" was one of my major inspirations. I recommend it to any crafter or jewelry maker.

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