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Tracie Smith's Profile

About

I am one of the few people blessed enough to say that I became "what I wanted to be" when I grew up.
Since I was a small child, I have loved the arts. Especially the ones that require my hands to get DIRTY! My sweet mother was wise enough to understand my love for art and introduced me to clay at a young age. Throughout highschool I would take art classes for fun. As I studied science in college, I also enjoyed art classes on the side, however, when I took my first Pottery class in my third year at college, I immediately switched my major, and graduated as an ART major, in Ceramics.

Pottery is a unique process. I start by hand 'thowing' clay on the wheel into a desired piece of dinnerware, bakeware, kitchen items and art pieces. This is the most fun, and least time-consuming part of creating pottery. Next, the pieces need to carfully dry over 2-6 days,…

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  • Female
  • Joined June 25, 2009

Favorite materials

Clay, Pastel paints, Oil paint

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About

I am one of the few people blessed enough to say that I became "what I wanted to be" when I grew up.
Since I was a small child, I have loved the arts. Especially the ones that require my hands to get DIRTY! My sweet mother was wise enough to understand my love for art and introduced me to clay at a young age. Throughout highschool I would take art classes for fun. As I studied science in college, I also enjoyed art classes on the side, however, when I took my first Pottery class in my third year at college, I immediately switched my major, and graduated as an ART major, in Ceramics.

Pottery is a unique process. I start by hand 'thowing' clay on the wheel into a desired piece of dinnerware, bakeware, kitchen items and art pieces. This is the most fun, and least time-consuming part of creating pottery. Next, the pieces need to carfully dry over 2-6 days, into the leather hard state, at this point, I neatly trim the pottery bases, attach handles, drill holes, and my favorite - paint the pottery with coloful porcelain slip. I then allow the pottery to dry until they are at the greenware state (Completely dry). After which, I sand out the unwanted imperfections and load up to 30 pieces into my small kiln.
The klin takes 24-48 hours to bisque fire and cool down.
Glazing is the next process, this too is time consuming. I begin by rinsing off the newly bisqued pottery, then I apply wax to all the areas I want left unglazed. After the pieces are waxed and allowed to dry, I will dip them in a glaze, sometimes two, in order to obtain the look I want. Again, the pottery must completely dry before it is re-loaded in the kiln and fired to a temperature over 2100 degrees F. This firing prosses takes 30-40 hours to complete.
It's always such a joy to open the kiln and look at all the beautifully finished vessles! I will remove them one by one and carefully sand the raw clay. The pottery is then ready to sell and ship.

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