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Paul and Kate's Profile

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Welcome to Paul and Kate Studio!

Check out our Facebook page and become a fan!
http://www.facebook.com/paulandkatestudio

Get to know us in this article from Etsy's blog:
http://www.etsy.com/storque/handmade-life/etsy-love-stories-paulandkatestudio-6955/

We live in Richmond, Virginia with our two noisy cats.

Paul focuses on the tactile qualities of clay- basing most of his work on pinch formed shapes and burnishing for a natural and organic feel. He enjoys the unpredictability and randomness of pit firings.

Kate's work is biologically inspired. Sea life, microorganisms, and anatomy all visibly influence her choice of shape, texture, and color…

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  • Joined August 9, 2009

Favorite materials

clay, fiber, wood, metal

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About

Welcome to Paul and Kate Studio!

Check out our Facebook page and become a fan!
http://www.facebook.com/paulandkatestudio

Get to know us in this article from Etsy's blog:
http://www.etsy.com/storque/handmade-life/etsy-love-stories-paulandkatestudio-6955/

We live in Richmond, Virginia with our two noisy cats.

Paul focuses on the tactile qualities of clay- basing most of his work on pinch formed shapes and burnishing for a natural and organic feel. He enjoys the unpredictability and randomness of pit firings.

Kate's work is biologically inspired. Sea life, microorganisms, and anatomy all visibly influence her choice of shape, texture, and color.



Raku:

Raku is considered the traditional method for creating bowls for the Japanese tea ceremony. It represents the concept of wabi, which is a movement away from luxury and excess. The term raku is derived from the Kanji character meaning "enjoyment" or "ease".

After the pottery has been bisque fired, it is glazed (or sometimes left unglazed) and fired in a raku kiln. At about 1800 degrees Fahrenheit the kiln is opened. The glowing hot pottery is removed from the kiln with tongs and immediately placed into a metal can filled with organic material such as newspaper or leaves. The heat from the pottery ignites the material and the lid is placed on the can. The fire quickly uses all the oxygen in the can and then draws it from the glaze and the clay itself.

This process encourages glazes to spontaneous crackle effects, metallic flashing, and color variations unique to each piece. It leaves unglazed clay darkened- anywhere from grays to rich blacks. Each raku firing is unique- no two pieces will ever look exactly alike.

Raku clay and glazes are porous and fragile and are not meant for food preparation. Raku pieces are not water-tight.

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