Close

Sarah Bernt's Profile

About

I started making candles about 15 years ago using the beeswax from my families beekeeping operation. What began as a very small hobby project with only dipped candles in mind (down in the basement) has grown into something that I love to do. As a stay at home mom it gives me a creative outlet and the little ones love to help too.

Beeswax is a useful and fragant gift from nature. 
About 150,000 bees are required to consume ten pounds of honey, from which only a single pound of beeswax is produced. Beeswax is created in the form of microscopic scales exuded from the underside of a bee's abdomen. They then take those tiny scales and chew them before sticking it wherever they need it in the hive. We harvest the wax as cappings that are cut off the honey comb in the extracting process and then heated to melting to separate the honey from the wax. The wax is then melted again and poured…

Read more

  • Female
  • Joined February 26, 2010

Favorite materials

Beeswax, cotton

Shop

About

I started making candles about 15 years ago using the beeswax from my families beekeeping operation. What began as a very small hobby project with only dipped candles in mind (down in the basement) has grown into something that I love to do. As a stay at home mom it gives me a creative outlet and the little ones love to help too.

Beeswax is a useful and fragant gift from nature. 
About 150,000 bees are required to consume ten pounds of honey, from which only a single pound of beeswax is produced. Beeswax is created in the form of microscopic scales exuded from the underside of a bee's abdomen. They then take those tiny scales and chew them before sticking it wherever they need it in the hive. We harvest the wax as cappings that are cut off the honey comb in the extracting process and then heated to melting to separate the honey from the wax. The wax is then melted again and poured through several different filters to clean and purify it, the more times it is filtered the more clean and pure it burns.

Beeswax is a renewable all natural product with no additives or fillers. It is safe enough to eat, use in cosmetics, and is most recognizable as a clean burning & bright fuel source in beeswax candles. Unlike most of the manufactured paraffin candles, beeswax is hypo-allergenic, great for people with allergies or other sensitivities and for those of us who want a safe, clean burning candle in our homes.


Beeswax melts at about 147F, the highest melting temperature of any known natural wax, which means that beeswax candles have longer burning times than other types of candles. It also means that beeswax candles and ornaments may be displayed and enjoyed in almost any area of the home. Compared by burn time, beeswax candles are usually a better value than paraffin, even when beeswax appears to cost more.

The wonderful aroma of beeswax comes from the hive and tends to remain in the wax no matter how many times it is heated or how long it sits. When we are making candles the whole place smells amazing!!

When beeswax has sat for a while it will develop a whitish haze called "bloom" and this can easily be removed by wiping with a soft rag, using a hair dryer to blow it off gently, or (my personal favorite) letting hot water run over the candle. This also removes dust easily and restores an old dull candle to that new luster again.

Unfollow username?

Are you sure you want to stop following this person?