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Jim Hurley's Profile

About

I started making knives in 1981 using the stock removal method and began forging my blades in 1996. I still use both methods but since I really enjoy forging the majority of my knives are hammered out.
All of my knives are made from high carbon, non-stainless steel (with the exception of railroad spikes and harrow tines which are medium carbon steels). Occasionally I make knives from virgin steel, but most are recycled from leaf springs, coil springs, old files, sawmill blades, bandsaw blades, grade 60 rebar and just about anything else I can get my hands on that has enough carbon to hold an edge.
While I prefer natural materials like antler, wood and bone for my handles I use man-made materials like micarta, corian and paracord as well. Sometimes the intended use of the knife will dictate what I use but mostly I go with what looks and feels right to me.
Most of my…

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  • Male
  • Born on April 26
  • Joined January 20, 2012

Favorite materials

Steel, copper, brass, wood, antler, bone, horn

About

I started making knives in 1981 using the stock removal method and began forging my blades in 1996. I still use both methods but since I really enjoy forging the majority of my knives are hammered out.
All of my knives are made from high carbon, non-stainless steel (with the exception of railroad spikes and harrow tines which are medium carbon steels). Occasionally I make knives from virgin steel, but most are recycled from leaf springs, coil springs, old files, sawmill blades, bandsaw blades, grade 60 rebar and just about anything else I can get my hands on that has enough carbon to hold an edge.
While I prefer natural materials like antler, wood and bone for my handles I use man-made materials like micarta, corian and paracord as well. Sometimes the intended use of the knife will dictate what I use but mostly I go with what looks and feels right to me.
Most of my sheathes are made from schedule 40 PVC since it offers advantages over leather. It's not as impact resistant as Kydex but you have to make an effort to break it, it doesn't shrink or stretch, it's resistant to most chemicals, it's waterproof and the friction fit holds the knife securely even when you shake it upside down. I do make two types of leather sheathes if the knife's overall look needs it. One is an ambidextrous pouch sheath and the other is a no-sew sheath.

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