Sylvia Linsteadt's Profile

About

Wild Talewort is the felted, herbal and gift-oriented extension of my two WIld Tales by Mail projects, the Gray Fox Epistles and the Leveret Letters. Every new and full moon, subscribers receive an original story in the mail, beautifully packaged, based on old mythic and folkloric themes, and wildly rooted in the ecosystems of the edge of California. Most items sold here are related in some way to these story-projects. For more information about story-subscriptions, please visit Wildtalewort.com.

For tales about my story-making, felting, dyeing, animal tracking, herb-crafting and more, visit Visit theindigovat.blogspot.com.

A note on felting—the process of wet-felting is the most ancient textile art in the world, with its origins far, far back in the steppes and caves of the Paleolithic and early Neolithic eras. Each piece here is…

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  • Female
  • Born on March 12
  • Joined June 19, 2012

Favorite materials

Word, ink, paper, wool, natural dye, felt, words, yarn, soil, seed, light, love

Shop

About

Wild Talewort is the felted, herbal and gift-oriented extension of my two WIld Tales by Mail projects, the Gray Fox Epistles and the Leveret Letters. Every new and full moon, subscribers receive an original story in the mail, beautifully packaged, based on old mythic and folkloric themes, and wildly rooted in the ecosystems of the edge of California. Most items sold here are related in some way to these story-projects. For more information about story-subscriptions, please visit Wildtalewort.com.

For tales about my story-making, felting, dyeing, animal tracking, herb-crafting and more, visit Visit theindigovat.blogspot.com.

A note on felting—the process of wet-felting is the most ancient textile art in the world, with its origins far, far back in the steppes and caves of the Paleolithic and early Neolithic eras. Each piece here is made with meditative care, often out in the yard with the birds flitting overhead, while the wool is layered, wetted, soaped and agitated by hand. The process is always a little bit of a mystery, because the wool, once wetted and then locked to itself via much agitation, changes its shape and patterns. This is one of my favorite things about creating works of felt-- they take on a life of their own! No two are ever exactly alike.


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Sylvia Linsteadt is a wanderer of the wild spaces of the Bay Area, a spinner of yarns (literally and figuratively), a felter of felts, and an animal-tracker. Good strong black tea with milk and a little honey is her fuel. Pennywhistle music, a hearty fire in the hearth, fog, fairytales and myths, all the voices of the birds in the morning in the black walnut ttree outside her window, bring her joy.

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