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Kerry C.'s Profile

About

At the tender age of three, my Mom framed my first piece of artwork, and swore I’d grow up to be an artist. Although my life path has taken me in many directions, I feel a constant pull toward the creative process. I am happiest when I am being creative, and producing things that have my unique outlook on life and experiences woven into them.
The inspiration for my current work stems from the Mexican celebration El Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead which occurs every year starting on October 31 and ending November 2, Sugar skulls are one of the most widely recognized symbols of this colorful celebration.
I love the mocking floral eyes of sugar skulls, and the colorful way they are decorated as though they are laughing at death.
Though traditionally, sugar skulls are made out of well, sugar…each of my Calaveras begins as a simple piece of clay. And in some cases hours later, become these little colorful trea…

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  • Female
  • Born on April 11
  • Joined September 12, 2010

Favorite materials

polymer clay, acrylic paint, love, whimsey, magic and glitter

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About

At the tender age of three, my Mom framed my first piece of artwork, and swore I’d grow up to be an artist. Although my life path has taken me in many directions, I feel a constant pull toward the creative process. I am happiest when I am being creative, and producing things that have my unique outlook on life and experiences woven into them.
The inspiration for my current work stems from the Mexican celebration El Dia de los Muertos, or Day of the Dead which occurs every year starting on October 31 and ending November 2, Sugar skulls are one of the most widely recognized symbols of this colorful celebration.
I love the mocking floral eyes of sugar skulls, and the colorful way they are decorated as though they are laughing at death.
Though traditionally, sugar skulls are made out of well, sugar…each of my Calaveras begins as a simple piece of clay. And in some cases hours later, become these little colorful treasures. I hope that you wear them in honor of someone you love,
Kerry C.
Artist and Owner of
Sugarskullshoppe.com

About "El Dia de los Muertos"
El Dia de los Muertos (the Day of the Dead), a Mexican celebration, is a day to celebrate and honor loved ones who have departed. On this day in Mexico, the streets near the cemeteries are filled with decorations of papel picado, flowers, candy calaveras (sugar skulls), and parades.
It is believed that the spirit of the dead visit their families on October 31 and leave on November 2. In order to celebrate, families make altars and place offerings of food, candles, incense, flowers (namely marigolds,) and most importantly a photo of the departed soul on the altar. Calaveras (skulls) are decorated with bright colors with the name of the departed inscribed on the head. Children carrying yellow marigolds enjoy the processions to the cemetery. At the cemetery, music is played and dances are made to honor the spirits.
Other cultures may view this as morbid, but the Mexican people react to death with mourning along with happiness and joy. They look at death with the same fear as any other culture, but there is a difference… they express their fear by mocking and living alongside death, having learned to accept it within their lives..
Death is a celebration in Mexico. Death is among them.

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