Genevieve Atkins' Profile

About

In 2007 I made my first silk quilt from used pieces of Japanese silk. These were 'bits' I'd bought at quilt and craft fairs. The quilt is the 'Chinese coins' design. I then bought a couple of used silk haori (worn over a kimono), unpicked them and used the entire haori fabric lengths for my tramlines and backing of that quilt.

The silk textures and designs continue to excite me. Most of the fabric I sell is vintage 60s and 70s. It was a beautiful era in silk weaving and quality. Shibori fabric, specially knotted and dyed, is a particular favourite of mine. Buying used silk kimono fabric is an economical way of purchasing special lengths of fabric to incorporate into new items (block piecing). I enjoy garment making and patchwork.

Almost all the lengths of used kimono or haori (over jacket, worn open) silk I have for sale have been washed first…

Read more

  • Female
  • Born on August 14
  • Joined June 7, 2011

Favorite materials

Silk, cotton, linen, wool

Shop

  • sugoi07
    Japanese silks, indigo cottons & handmade

About

In 2007 I made my first silk quilt from used pieces of Japanese silk. These were 'bits' I'd bought at quilt and craft fairs. The quilt is the 'Chinese coins' design. I then bought a couple of used silk haori (worn over a kimono), unpicked them and used the entire haori fabric lengths for my tramlines and backing of that quilt.

The silk textures and designs continue to excite me. Most of the fabric I sell is vintage 60s and 70s. It was a beautiful era in silk weaving and quality. Shibori fabric, specially knotted and dyed, is a particular favourite of mine. Buying used silk kimono fabric is an economical way of purchasing special lengths of fabric to incorporate into new items (block piecing). I enjoy garment making and patchwork.

Almost all the lengths of used kimono or haori (over jacket, worn open) silk I have for sale have been washed first. I use pure soap (Lux flakes). I wash the fabric for several reasons, including: 1) freshening the smell of the fabric (alas, the Japanese are still quite into smoking) 2) getting rid of some surface dirt but not washed-in stains, 3) checking for colour fastness. This latter one is particularly important to me, because I do sew the fabric into garments, quilts, bags and scarves.

New blog about all my craft passions is under construction, December 2014.

Facebook:
Sugoi Japanese Upcycled Fabrics Tasmania

Unfollow username?

Are you sure you want to stop following this person?