2Bready

2B-ready

Dordrecht, The Netherlands · 17 Sales

2Bready

2B-ready

Dordrecht, The Netherlands 17 Sales On Etsy since 2013

0 out of 5 stars
(3)

Announcement   Hi there, so nice of you to visit my shop!
2B-ready's keywords are: jeans, re-use, upcycle and accessoiries.

Because I feel it's important that we pass the world we live in in its best form, I re-use a lot and I recycle what I can recycle. That also means I re-use worn jeans. Jeans is a very strong fabric. If a pair of jeans is worn, you can still use it. And that's what I do! Stop waste, think creative!
By carefully detaching the jeans, I can create new items. Think of neckties, bowties, collars, placemats and more. Check out my recent products in the shop.

Interview:
http://www.workyourart.com/interview/a-conversation-with-lian-admiraal-from-south-holland-the-netherlands/

Custom order:
If you like an item, but it is just a little different from what you'd really like, do not hesitate to send me a custom request.

If you have any feedback, I'm always willing to learn, let me know!

Instagram & Pinterest: @2bready
Facebook: www.facebook.com/2bready

Announcement

Last updated on Feb 9, 2016

Hi there, so nice of you to visit my shop!
2B-ready's keywords are: jeans, re-use, upcycle and accessoiries.

Because I feel it's important that we pass the world we live in in its best form, I re-use a lot and I recycle what I can recycle. That also means I re-use worn jeans. Jeans is a very strong fabric. If a pair of jeans is worn, you can still use it. And that's what I do! Stop waste, think creative!
By carefully detaching the jeans, I can create new items. Think of neckties, bowties, collars, placemats and more. Check out my recent products in the shop.

Interview:
http://www.workyourart.com/interview/a-conversation-with-lian-admiraal-from-south-holland-the-netherlands/

Custom order:
If you like an item, but it is just a little different from what you'd really like, do not hesitate to send me a custom request.

If you have any feedback, I'm always willing to learn, let me know!

Instagram & Pinterest: @2bready
Facebook: www.facebook.com/2bready

Lian Admiraal

Contact shop owner

Lian Admiraal

Reviews

No reviews in the last year
lieveroppapier

lieveroppapier on Oct 13, 2015

5 out of 5 stars

Precies zoals de foto, erg leuk dus! Bedankt.

Translate to English
SHELLI RAE MACGREGOR

SHELLI RAE MACGREGOR on May 12, 2015

5 out of 5 stars

Love my new headband, it is unique and fun. I get lots of complements.nit arrived promptly..thank you, thank you‼️

queenbeecanada

Inactive Etsy Member on Nov 18, 2014

5 out of 5 stars

the creativity of this design was genuinely refreshing and very well made - I have no doubts this will make the perfect present for a perfect girl - thank you so so much I love it.

About

The origin of jeans

Jeans are trousers often made from denim or dungaree cloth. Often the term "jeans" refers to a particular style of pants, called "blue jeans" and invented by Jacob Davis and Levi Strauss in 1873. Starting in the 1950s, jeans, originally designed for cowboys and miners, became popular among teenagers, especially members of the greaser subculture. Historic brands include Levi's, Lee, and Wrangler. Jeans come in various fits, including skinny, tapered, slim, straight, boot cut, narrow bottom, low waist, anti-fit, and flare. Owing to their high durability as compared to other common fabrics, "distressed" (visibly aged and worn, but still intact and functional) jean trousers have become increasingly fashionable, making pre-sale "factory distressing" a common feature in commercially-sold jeans.
Jeans are now a very popular article of casual dress around the world. They come in many styles and colors. However, blue jeans are particularly identified with American culture, especially the American Old West.

Jean fabric

Research on the trade of jean fabric shows that it emerged in the cities of Genoa, Italy, and Nimes, France. Gênes, the French word for Genoa, may be the origin of the word "jeans". In Nimes, weavers tried to reproduce jean but instead developed a similar twill fabric that became known as denim, from de Nimes, meaning "from Nimes". Genoa’s jean was a fustian textile of “medium quality and of reasonable cost”, very similar to cotton corduroy for which Genoa was famous, and was "used for work clothes in general". Nimes’s “denim” was coarser, considered higher quality and was used "for over garments such as smocks or overalls".
Copper rivets for reinforcing pockets are a characteristic feature of blue jeans.
By the 17th century, jean was a crucial textile for working-class people in Northern Italy. This is seen in a series of genre paintings from around the 17th century attributed to an artist now named The Master of the Blue Jeans. The ten paintings depict impoverished scenes with lower-class figures wearing a fabric that looks like denim. The fabric but would have been Genoese jean, which was cheaper. Genre painting came to prominence in late 16th century, and the low-life subject matter in all ten paintings places them among others that portray similar scenes.
The importance of jean is also shown by the history of textile trade. Genoese sailors used jean to cover and protect their goods on the docks from the weather. During the Republic of Genoa, sailors exported jeans throughout Europe.

Jean became popular in the United States when Levi Strauss & Co.’s introduced blue jean overalls in 1873. Levi Strauss as a young man in 1851 emigrated from Germany to New York to join his older brothers who ran a dry goods store. In 1853, he moved to San Francisco to establish his own dry goods business. Jacob Davis was a tailor who often bought bolts of cloth from the Levi Strauss & Co. wholesale house. In 1872, Davis wrote to Strauss asking to partner with him to patent and sell clothing reinforced with rivet.[5] The copper rivets were to reinforce the points of stress, such as pocket corners and at the bottom of the button fly. Levi accepted Davis's offer,[6] and the two men received US patent No. 139,121 for an "Improvement in Fastening Pocket-Openings" on 20 May 1873. (For example the classic Levi 501 jeans.)
Davis and Strauss experimented with different fabrics. An early attempt was brown cotton duck, a bottom-weight fabric. Finding denim a more suitable material for work-pants, they began using it to manufacture their riveted pants. The denim used was produced by an American manufacturer, but popular legend states it was imported from Nimes, France. A popular myth is that Strauss initially sold brown canvas pants to miners, later dyed them blue, turned to using denim, and only after Davis wrote to him, added rivets.

Worldwide market for jeans
North America accounts for 39% of global purchases for jeans, followed by Western Europe at 20%, Japan and Korea at 10% and the rest of the world at 31%.
Evolution of the garment
Initially, jeans were simply sturdy trousers worn by factory workers. During this period, men's jeans had the zipper down the front, whereas women's jeans had the zipper down the left side. Fewer jeans were made during World War II, but 'waist overalls' were introduced to the world by American soldiers, who sometimes wore them off duty. By the 1960s, both men's and women's jeans had the zipper down the front. Historic photographs indicate that in the decades before they became a staple of fashion, jeans generally fit quite loosely, much like a pair of bib overalls without the bib. Indeed, until 1960, Levi Strauss called its flagship product "waist overalls" rather than "jeans".

The blue denim fabric of jeans
After James Dean popularized them in the movie Rebel Without a Cause, wearing jeans became a symbol of youth rebellion during the 1950s. Because of this, they were sometimes banned in theaters, restaurants and schools.[11] During the 1960s the wearing of jeans became more acceptable, and by the 1970s it had become general fashion in the United States for casual wear.[12]
Michael Belluomo, editor of Sportswear International Magazine, Oct/Nov 1987, P. 45, wrote that in 1965, Limbo, a boutique in the New York East Village, was "the first retailer to wash a new pair of jeans to get a used, worn effect, and the idea became a hit." He continued, "[Limbo] hired East Village artists to embellish the jeans with patches, decals, and other touches, and sold them for $200." In the early 1980s the denim industry introduced the stone-washing technique developed by GWG also known as "Great Western Garment Co." Donald Freeland of Edmonton, Alberta pioneered the method,[13] which helped to bring denim to a larger and more versatile market. Acceptance of jeans continued through the 1980s and 1990s to the point where jeans are, in the first decade of 21st century, a wardrobe staple, with the average North American owning seven pairs.[14][verification needed] Currently, jeans may be seen worn by people of all genders and ages.

Source: Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia 2014.

Shop members

  • Lian Admiraal

    Owner, Creator

    working mom of 2 boys, 36 years old, primary work is being medical secretary. Eventually it would be awesome to be able to make 2B-ready my primary work. I love being creative and designing and making everything with jeans and beads. It keeps my mind young and creative!

Shop policies

Last updated on February 9, 2016
Hi all,
Thanks for checking out my shop 2B-ready right here!

All sorts of products made of jeans are here for you. Why would we use new raw materials every time when we can also re-use some? That's why!

Miss anything? Want a custom request? let me know!

Accepted payment methods

  • Accepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits
Returns and exchanges
Is the item you bought not what you expected? Please send me an e-mail that you want to return it and I will give you a return number that you must mention on the package, then return the item and you will receive a refund for that item. If you do not contact me first, and don't have a return number in the package, I will not refund the item.

Also note that I'm not responsible for packages lost or damaged in mail.
Payment
Within NL you can pay by "overschrijving".

In NL and all other countries you can use credit card, iDeal or PayPal to buy goods from 2B-ready.

It is also possible to pay wit Etsy giftcard.
Shipping
I'll try to ship your order ASAP, but surely within the time-frame stated in the listing.

Some countries charge tax and/ or duty on your package, I can't be held responsible. Please check with me what form you need to fill in, costs will be at your account.

All items will be sent by regular mail. For international countries: with priority mail. This means: NO insurance, NO tracking number. Do you wish to add insurance, please let me know in the additional information for seller or contact me before your purchase.