Desertchurrosrovings

Navajo Churro Sheep Roving

Acton, California

Announcement    DESERT CHURROS ROVINGS 2020 RECAP!
I am honored to be part of the weaving / fiber community. Through ETSY, my weaving Guild – Hand Weavers of the Valley in Exeter, the various Fiber shows, the Southern California Fiber Shed guided by Leslie Roberts, and LA Textile Arts with Carrie Burkle and Leslie Roberts, I’ve met the most amazing weavers and fiber artists.

Each purchase of my Navajo churro Roving or yarn carries a story with it. If I’m lucky, I get to learn a bit about the weavers and what they do with the fibers from my flock of Navajo Churro Sheep.

2020 was no exception. My dear friend and Navajo Two Grey Hills Weaver, Irene Bennalley and I are providing yarn for two clothing designers in Los Angeles. We are having fun providing yarn for the designers and are also educating them on what it takes to produce fibers from our flocks. We shear two times a year, so there is a timing to when they can get their fibers for their yarns. We are honored that the designers are wanting to explore using the fiber from the Navajo Churro Sheep for clothing. I do sell some of Irene's handspun yarn from her flock of Navajo Churro sheep on my ETSY site. You can call Irene directly for fleeces, yarn, or tapestry pieces at 505-793-8038.

Leslie Horan Simon: I was also honored to have provided a fleece from my ewe Anna to Leslie Horan Simon of New York City for her felted pieces which included wool from over 100 rare breeds of sheep. See Leslie’s website at www.lesliehoransimon.com. Her piece “Devotion” is made completely of Navajo Churro Sheep wool provided by Irene Bennalley, Sonja Payne – Woolhalla Tunis Sheep, and myself.

Leslie has developed her own wool processing and felting procedure to create her exquisite felted pieces. She explains parts of this processing and felting method in the video section of her website. You can also visit her work on her Instagram page - Lesliehoransimon

Sonja Payne – WoolhallaTunis Sheep – Sonja Payne of Queen Creek, Arizona not only breeds and sells the wool from her Tunis Sheep, she is a purveyor of roving from small farm sheep breeders. I’m thankful that Sonja found my farm and promotes the roving from Desert Churros Rovings! You can see Sonja’s Instagram page at AZTunis.

Linda Hayden – Saddle blankets Another dear friend, Linda Hayden of Three Rivers, CA, is a cattle rancher and weaver of amazingly crafted saddle blankets – see - saddleblankets [!at] haydenranches.com Linda sells her saddleblankets all over the United States and in several countries on the globe. Linda loves my Navajo Churro Roving for her blankets. Thank you Linda!

Elisabeth Hurtado: Early in the Covid year I made the acquaintance with a special woman, Elisabeth Hurtado. Elisabeth started out the Covid year spinning yarn for the “Adopt An Elder” program to provide yarn for Native American Weavers. See www.anelder.org Elisabeth had spun yarn for her friend Elaine Dracia Greenberg many years ago. Elaine Dracia Greenberg was a very talented rug restorer in the Davis, CA area and made a huge impression on Elisabeth.
I was impressed with Elisabeth’s desire to help the Native American Elders by providing yarn for them. Elisabeth steadily purchased roving from me through the year for the Adopt an Elder program and she also provided handspun yarn for a local rug weaver Julie Gerard of Ojai, CA. Elisabeth is a very creative dyer of her yarns and uses natural dyes. She is not afraid to combine dyes to achieve the color she needs!
Elisabeth is now getting back to her weaving and learning tapestry after many years. It has been so much fun to see how quickly she is picking up her weaving skills again.
Elisabeth often talks about how much she learned from her time working for Elaine Dracia Greenberg. In 1989 Elaine learned the craft/ art of rug restoration from Noel Bennett through Noel’s non-profit Shared Horizons. Noel taught the restoration classes at her Navajo Weaving Restoration Center in Corrales, New Mexico. Elisabeth and I were able to contact Ms. Bennett in Santa Fe, who told us that Elaine was one of her students at the Center. Noel said that she and one of her apprentices, Kim Mumbower, taught the class Elaine was in. Noel said that Elaine was a very enthusiastic student and absorbed the rug restoration techniques like a sponge! It was so nice to communicate with Noel Bennett. Her books on weaving which she authored with Tiana Bighorse are classics in weaving education. One of the famous books that is used for Navajo rug weaving is “Working with The Wool” by Noel Bennett and Tiana Bighorse.
After Elaine learned rug restoration from Noel Bennett, she worked restoring rugs out of her house in Davis and at the Native American Gallery of the American West which was located in Old Sacramento. The Gallery was owned by Leon Hodges for many years. Mr. Hodges said that one of his suppliers of Native American rugs, Keith Palmer, would provide rugs which needed restoring for Elaine. Rug restoration takes great patience and skill and one has to try to get into the mind of the weaver of the original rug to restore the to its original design and color. Elaine Dracia Greenberg made a great impression on Elisabeth Hurtado and Elisabeth was saddened to learn that Elaine passed away in 2014. Elaine will not be forgotten.
It was a pleasure to provide roving for Elisabeth Hurtado for her work with the Adopt a Native project and to see her get back to the skills she learned from Elaine Dracia Greenberg. In learning about Elaine, it was also very interesting to communicate with Noel Bennett who is still very active. Noel said that she is working on the Legacy of Tiana Bighorse website. Noel said that her Shared Horizons organization is considering doing a Native American rug restoration manual if there is demand for it. You may contact Noel Bennett at noel [!at] noelbennett.com.

Julie Gerard: It has been a pleasure to see the beautiful rugs that Julie Gerard has woven with Navajo Churro Wool this year. I’m thankful that Julie is using some of my Navajo Churro Roving for her rugs! You can see Julie’s beautiful rugs on Instagram at heritagechurrowoolweavings

Thank you to all of my ETSY customers. Good Spinning and weaving to you!

Announcement

Last updated on Feb 9, 2021

DESERT CHURROS ROVINGS 2020 RECAP!
I am honored to be part of the weaving / fiber community. Through ETSY, my weaving Guild – Hand Weavers of the Valley in Exeter, the various Fiber shows, the Southern California Fiber Shed guided by Leslie Roberts, and LA Textile Arts with Carrie Burkle and Leslie Roberts, I’ve met the most amazing weavers and fiber artists.

Each purchase of my Navajo churro Roving or yarn carries a story with it. If I’m lucky, I get to learn a bit about the weavers and what they do with the fibers from my flock of Navajo Churro Sheep.

2020 was no exception. My dear friend and Navajo Two Grey Hills Weaver, Irene Bennalley and I are providing yarn for two clothing designers in Los Angeles. We are having fun providing yarn for the designers and are also educating them on what it takes to produce fibers from our flocks. We shear two times a year, so there is a timing to when they can get their fibers for their yarns. We are honored that the designers are wanting to explore using the fiber from the Navajo Churro Sheep for clothing. I do sell some of Irene's handspun yarn from her flock of Navajo Churro sheep on my ETSY site. You can call Irene directly for fleeces, yarn, or tapestry pieces at 505-793-8038.

Leslie Horan Simon: I was also honored to have provided a fleece from my ewe Anna to Leslie Horan Simon of New York City for her felted pieces which included wool from over 100 rare breeds of sheep. See Leslie’s website at www.lesliehoransimon.com. Her piece “Devotion” is made completely of Navajo Churro Sheep wool provided by Irene Bennalley, Sonja Payne – Woolhalla Tunis Sheep, and myself.

Leslie has developed her own wool processing and felting procedure to create her exquisite felted pieces. She explains parts of this processing and felting method in the video section of her website. You can also visit her work on her Instagram page - Lesliehoransimon

Sonja Payne – WoolhallaTunis Sheep – Sonja Payne of Queen Creek, Arizona not only breeds and sells the wool from her Tunis Sheep, she is a purveyor of roving from small farm sheep breeders. I’m thankful that Sonja found my farm and promotes the roving from Desert Churros Rovings! You can see Sonja’s Instagram page at AZTunis.

Linda Hayden – Saddle blankets Another dear friend, Linda Hayden of Three Rivers, CA, is a cattle rancher and weaver of amazingly crafted saddle blankets – see - saddleblankets [!at] haydenranches.com Linda sells her saddleblankets all over the United States and in several countries on the globe. Linda loves my Navajo Churro Roving for her blankets. Thank you Linda!

Elisabeth Hurtado: Early in the Covid year I made the acquaintance with a special woman, Elisabeth Hurtado. Elisabeth started out the Covid year spinning yarn for the “Adopt An Elder” program to provide yarn for Native American Weavers. See www.anelder.org Elisabeth had spun yarn for her friend Elaine Dracia Greenberg many years ago. Elaine Dracia Greenberg was a very talented rug restorer in the Davis, CA area and made a huge impression on Elisabeth.
I was impressed with Elisabeth’s desire to help the Native American Elders by providing yarn for them. Elisabeth steadily purchased roving from me through the year for the Adopt an Elder program and she also provided handspun yarn for a local rug weaver Julie Gerard of Ojai, CA. Elisabeth is a very creative dyer of her yarns and uses natural dyes. She is not afraid to combine dyes to achieve the color she needs!
Elisabeth is now getting back to her weaving and learning tapestry after many years. It has been so much fun to see how quickly she is picking up her weaving skills again.
Elisabeth often talks about how much she learned from her time working for Elaine Dracia Greenberg. In 1989 Elaine learned the craft/ art of rug restoration from Noel Bennett through Noel’s non-profit Shared Horizons. Noel taught the restoration classes at her Navajo Weaving Restoration Center in Corrales, New Mexico. Elisabeth and I were able to contact Ms. Bennett in Santa Fe, who told us that Elaine was one of her students at the Center. Noel said that she and one of her apprentices, Kim Mumbower, taught the class Elaine was in. Noel said that Elaine was a very enthusiastic student and absorbed the rug restoration techniques like a sponge! It was so nice to communicate with Noel Bennett. Her books on weaving which she authored with Tiana Bighorse are classics in weaving education. One of the famous books that is used for Navajo rug weaving is “Working with The Wool” by Noel Bennett and Tiana Bighorse.
After Elaine learned rug restoration from Noel Bennett, she worked restoring rugs out of her house in Davis and at the Native American Gallery of the American West which was located in Old Sacramento. The Gallery was owned by Leon Hodges for many years. Mr. Hodges said that one of his suppliers of Native American rugs, Keith Palmer, would provide rugs which needed restoring for Elaine. Rug restoration takes great patience and skill and one has to try to get into the mind of the weaver of the original rug to restore the to its original design and color. Elaine Dracia Greenberg made a great impression on Elisabeth Hurtado and Elisabeth was saddened to learn that Elaine passed away in 2014. Elaine will not be forgotten.
It was a pleasure to provide roving for Elisabeth Hurtado for her work with the Adopt a Native project and to see her get back to the skills she learned from Elaine Dracia Greenberg. In learning about Elaine, it was also very interesting to communicate with Noel Bennett who is still very active. Noel said that she is working on the Legacy of Tiana Bighorse website. Noel said that her Shared Horizons organization is considering doing a Native American rug restoration manual if there is demand for it. You may contact Noel Bennett at noel [!at] noelbennett.com.

Julie Gerard: It has been a pleasure to see the beautiful rugs that Julie Gerard has woven with Navajo Churro Wool this year. I’m thankful that Julie is using some of my Navajo Churro Roving for her rugs! You can see Julie’s beautiful rugs on Instagram at heritagechurrowoolweavings

Thank you to all of my ETSY customers. Good Spinning and weaving to you!

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Katherine Tucker

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Katherine Tucker

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About Desertchurrosrovings

Sales 250
On Etsy since 2015

I love the Navajo Churro breed of Sheep and their wool

My love of the Navajo Churro sheep and their wool is an evolving story. I started out working my herding dogs - Australian shepherds, with different sheep, I then progressed to getting interested in raising Navajo Churro sheep for their wool. I liked the idea of preserving this wonderful breed of sheep. I love caring for the churros and breeding for excellent wool quality. I have my wool carefully processed and I enjoy learning about how these fibers can be used - from rugs to blankets. I have two looms and am learning about weaving rugs and other projects suitable for this wool. Along the way, I am meeting amazingly talented weavers and spinners who are very generous with their time and knowledge.

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