KingsForgeGlass

King's Forge Glass

Monaghan, Ireland · 54 Sales

KingsForgeGlass

King's Forge Glass

Monaghan, Ireland 54 Sales On Etsy since 2011

5 out of 5 stars
(18)

Announcement   One-off kiln-formed glass items designed, cut and fused by me in my Irish countryside studio!
Have a look at my website http://www.kingsforgeglass.com to read about the story of the old forge, now my beloved studio, and keep up to date with me and my goings-on on Facebook!
I'm a proud member of the Etsy Ireland Team!
Search for wonderful Irish-made things on Etsy using the tag 'etsyirelandteam'.
Check out the blog at: www.etsyireland.blogspot.com

Announcement
Last updated on Jun 16, 2016

One-off kiln-formed glass items designed, cut and fused by me in my Irish countryside studio!
Have a look at my website http://www.kingsforgeglass.com to read about the story of the old forge, now my beloved studio, and keep up to date with me and my goings-on on Facebook!
I'm a proud member of the Etsy Ireland Team!
Search for wonderful Irish-made things on Etsy using the tag 'etsyirelandteam'.
Check out the blog at: www.etsyireland.blogspot.com

Grace Brennan

Contact shop owner

Grace Brennan

Golden Rose in Fused Glass Framed Art
US$79.10
Kiln-formed Candy Dish with Lots of Colour
US$39.55
Monochrome Fused Glass Mirror in Black & White
US$96.05
Wall Vase in Fused Glass - Purple Garden
US$39.55

Reviews

Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(18)
corinelelys06

corinelelys06 on Jul 8, 2016

5 out of 5 stars

Très belle œuvre d art et encadrement parfait ! Grace est charmante 👏✨

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Jen Rodeffer

Jen Rodeffer on Feb 17, 2016

5 out of 5 stars

Absolutely gorgeous! Super high quality! I was initially nervous about ordering a glass ornament from overseas, but it was extremely well packaged, and survived the trip with no problems. LOVE IT!

View all 18 reviews

About

The History and Re-discovery of King's Forge

Once upon a time, almost a hundred years ago, a south Armagh man by the name of Frank King made his way to a rural hillside in County Monaghan, where he set up a makeshift blacksmith's forge in a roadside shed. He met and married a local girl, Kathleen, and moved further up Mullyash mountain, close to her family home.
King's Forge was a thriving blacksmith's business, and became a local landmark. Set in a somewhat remote area outside the town of Castleblayney, King's Forge was nonetheless the scene of many a debacle, located, as it was, at the junction of a popular smuggling route across the border with Northern Ireland.
Smuggling was not the only underhand activity. Castleblayney Garda Station houses a photo from the 1920s, which shows a line-up of proud policemen, with the stash of poitín equipment they had uncovered in the environs of the old forge.
Over the years, improvements were made to their humble home. In the 1930s, the Kings extended the original cottage. To one side was a henhouse, while to the other, the turf house connected their home to the forge.
As years passed and progress brought tractors and machinery to local farms, the need for a blacksmith lessened, and business slacked. On their deaths, the old forge was left empty, and it wasn't long before the house became uninhabitable.
In the 1970s, the forge changed hands, coincidentally to another, although unrelated, Frank King. He never made use of the buildings, and eventually put the property back on the market.
One foggy night late in 2003, I came upon the derelict building. After more than two years of house-hunting, the 'For Sale' sign seemed to shine like a beacon in the fog. I came back to see the forge again the following day, and six months later it was mine.
That's not the end of the story. After two years of work on a budget tighter than the Irish economy, the day came when once again, smoke could be seen billowing from the chimney of King's Forge.
In the meantime, numerous passers-by have stopped to tell me their tales of growing up while the forge was smoking away. As children on their way home from Mullyash National School, many were called to stop and hold a horse for a few minutes. Hours would pass, and Frank would keep them working. Others told of Mrs King, who always had the kettle on the boil, and loved callers to stop awhile.
Now the forge is once again a busy workshop, where the kiln is kept going, fusing glass into shapes large and small, in every colour in the rainbow. My mountaintop view from the studio window reveals miles and miles of perfect rural landscape, covering all the drumlins of Co. Monaghan, and much of Co. Cavan beyond. Nothing could be more inspiring.
The kitchen is now where the turf house once stood, and the kettle is still boiling. King's Forge studio is open by appointment, and visitors are welcome to a cup of tea, and maybe even a home-baked treat, if they're lucky!
Thank you for taking the time to read the true story of King's Forge. When you hold a piece of King's Forge Glass, you're keeping a little bit of Irish history alive in your hands.
Grace Brennan
www.kingsforgeglass.com

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  • Grace

    Owner

    When I'm not making gorgeous glass things, I can be found in my wellies out on the farm! The landscapes I make in glass reflect my love of sheep. Although I'm sometimes called in to help with cattle, they're a bit too big and unpredictable for me. But the sheep have a handle on my heart. ;-)

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