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OddlyEnchantingGems' Shop Announcement

Fabulously Enchanting gemstones and findings in small quantities for those that are looking for a little sparkle. Use coupon code: SUNSHINE20 for 20% off orders over $50

PLEASE read this:
Scorolite is not a new fancy stone. It's synthetic quartz with a surface treatment- sometimes it's also sold as lavender opal.

Opal quartz is synthetic quartz with a surface treatment.

Corundum quartz is synthetic quartz, made in gemstone colors similar to fancy sapphire. It is NOT sapphire, the use of corundum in the title is misleading.

Cherry quartz, pineapple quartz, blueberry quartz are all glass. Not quartz, and not rare or valuable. It's an imitation stone- it's glass pretending to be a gemstone. Sometimes lepidocrocite in quartz is labeled as strawberry quartz, so not all the fruit names are imitations.

Synthetic is the same as lab grown, and it's the perfect way to get BIG stones that have excellent coloring that are FLAWLESS. Any listing for a stone over 1 carat that has flawless in the title should be looked at twice. I've had to learn the hard way that just because your supplier swears that the stones comes from Brazil and they list a treatment does NOT mean that it's a natural stone. Synthetics cost $1-3 per carat for really large stones, whereas a natural stone would be ten times as expensive for the same size.

About pearls- most pearls on the market are cultured. Truly natural pearls are both VERY expensive and VERY rare. There are two types of cultured pearls- saltwater and freshwater. Akoya, South Sea, Tahitian, and Sea of Cortez pearls are saltwater (and expensive for high quality) If you're looking for good pearls without breaking the bank, cultured freshwater pearls are a good way to go. China is a huge producer of freshwater AND Akoya pearls.

Keshi pearls are NOT considered natural pearls because they are a byproduct of the culturing process.

Shell pearls- regardless of "special" titles like South Sea shell pearl- are NOT PEARLS. They are usually plastic or glass coated to look like real pearls.


***Just finished up, and now I'm officially an A.J.P (accredited jewelry professional) through G.I.A. with a Pearls certificate. I'll be taking the second part to get the Graduate Pearls degree in October ***PLEASE read the shop policies with regard to colored gemstones and grading. It also explains the difference between natural, synthetic, and imitation. I want happy customers, and it will help us both out greatly. Also, in case I forget to put it in the listing- all gems that I had drilled but were intended to be set gems are pointy on the back. Unless specified as natural or synthetic for the Focal Stones, I am not 100% certain- it usually means the supplier says that they are natural but I have doubts. I don't have enough experience to be able to make the call at this point and testing is very expensive, so it's a toss-up. I'm going to start listing the stones I believe to be synthetic as lab grown in the listing, regardless of what my suppliers say.


OddlyEnchantingGems' Shop Policies

Welcome

I love all things sparkly, and this shop is where I can share my accumulation of gemstones and gemstone beads. I'm currently enrolled in GIA's graduate gemologist program, so I do take all things sparkly seriously.

I've received a LOT of questions about "natural" versus synthetic. I disclose ALL known synthetics that I sell, and currently the only synthetics in my shop are the Czochralski alexandrite. Please know that most "natural" stones are treated to enhance their color and durability. Unless I state that the stone is UNTREATED, it's probably undergone some treatment. Stones that I commonly sell that ARE treated include:
Topaz- heat and irradiation turn the stones pink, red, swiss, and london blue. These colors do NOT occur in nature. Untreated blue topaz is pale, almost aquamarine in color.
Citrine- most citrine in the market starts its life as amethyst. They are both varieties of quartz, and with a little heat the purple changes to golden yellow.
Tanzanite- ALL tanzanite on the market has been heat treated. It comes out of the ground an icky brown color and becomes the lovely blue-violet stone that we all love.
At the bottom of this I've listed gemstones and their common clarity/ grading values. After reading this you will be able to tell that someone offering a flawless 10ct aquamarine for $20 is obviously not selling a natural stone. The first tip-off should be the words flawless and aquamarine used together, secondly the size for flawless, and third the price.
If you have ANY questions about a stone I have listed, please convo me. I'll be happy to answer any questions and will update listings if I've forgotten an important detail.

If you want to learn more on your own, here's a good gathering of resources:
http://www.gia.edu
http://www.gemologyonline.com/synthetics.html
http://www.finejewelrydesigns.com/synthetic-gemstone.html
http://jewelry.about.com/cs/thegems/a/gem_terminology.htm
http://www.glimmeringgems.com/Buyer_Guide/Natural_Synthetic.htm

*****A synthetic gemstone is identical to a natural gemstone in almost every way. This includes the same basic crystal structure, refractive index, specific gravity, chemical composition, colors, and other characteristics. Since the same gemological tests are used for stone identification on both natural and synthetic gems, it is sometimes even possible for a gemologist to be puzzled as to whether or not a stone is natural or synthetic. When this occurs, the best course of action is to send the stone to an accredited gem laboratory, like the Gemological Institute of America. They can positively determine whether a stone is synthetic or naturally occuring. Only minor internal characteristics allow separation of a synthetic gemstone from a natural gemstone.
******Please don't confuse synthetic with artificial- artificial is the term used when something completely different stands in for the actual gemstone. An example is cubic zirconia is used as an artificial diamond.

*****Please note that for most gemstone beads (unless otherwise detailed) the stones are not of the same quality as stones that are set in fine jewelry- that's why they are beads and not set stones.
To ensure that we are both happy I'd like to share some info about colored gemstones and their grading:
Colored Gemstone Grading Basics

When buying jewelry, everyone asks about the diamond grade but most people forget to consider the grade of the colored gemstones. Colored gemstones also have a grading system.

Determing the grade of a colored gemstone is actually more difficult than judging the grade of a diamond. Mostly because it takes many different tools and the knowledge of how to use those tools as well as a good memory what the results of each test and how it applies to the three gemstone types. Finally, once you have determined the stones characteristics, judging how they affect the value is also more complex than with diamonds. Additionally, there is far more publicized pricing guides for diamonds than there is for colored gemstones. A great rule of thumb that I try to instill in our customers is to do your best to ask yourself, "does this stone have magic". If the answer is yes, then it is probably a decent stone.

The gemstone grading system is based on the Four C’s just like diamond grading system. Clarity, Color, Cut and Carat Weight . In my opinion, color being the most significant.
The following is a table of faceted Type I, II and III colored gemstones most often found in the marketplace:
Type I
(often inclusion free)
Aquamarine, Quartz (smokey), Tanzanite, Topaz, Tourmaline (green), Zircon (blue)
Type II
(Usually included)
Alexandrite, Amethyst, Citrine, Corundum, Garnets, Iolite, Peridot, Ruby, Sapphire, Tourmaline (blue, orange, yellow), Zircon (green, orange, red, yellow)
Type III
(Almost always included)
Emerald, Tourmaline (pink, red, watermelon)


Type I Clarity Grades

* VVS - Very,Very Slightly Included: Characterized by MINUTE inclusions, which are difficult to see under 10x and invisible to the unaided eye. Even under 10x, a VVS stone may at first seem to have no inclusions, only blemishes (in exceptional stones this may in fact be true).

Typical inclusions: pinpoints, very fine needles, tiny hairline feathers, minor color zoning, very faint clouds, and percussion marks.

* VS - Very Slightly Included: Characterized by MINOR inclusions, which are somewhat easy to see under 10x but usually invisible to the unaided eye.

Typical inclusions: small included crystals, liquid inclusions, numerous fine needles, small fingerprints, and small feathers.

* SI1 -SI2 - Slightly Included: Characterized by NOTICEABLE inclusions, which are apparent under 10x. In SI1 they are usually visible, and in SI2 quite visible to the unaided eye.Inclusions normally have low relief.

Typical Inclusions: included crystals, large fingerprints, chips, feathers, considerable color zoning and dense clouds.

* I1-I2-I3-Imperfect: Characterized by inclusions that have a negative effect on either appearance or durability, or both. In I1, there is a moderate effect on either factor; in I2, a severe effect on either factor; in I3, a severe effect on both factors. Inclusions are often large and prominent to the unaided eye, and there may be noticeable loss of transaparency.

* Dcl-De'classe': Characterized by inclusions so numerous the entire stone is no longer transparent but translucent at best. Dcl stones lack the beauty and\or durability of faceted gemstones.

Type II Clarity Grades

* VVS - Very,Very Slightly Included: Characterized by MINOR inclusions, which are somewhat easy to see under 10x but usually invisible to the unaided eye.

Typical inclusions: small included crystals, liquid inclusions, fine needles, fingerprints, tiny feathers and minor color zoning.

* VS - Very Slightly Included: Characterized by NOTICEABLE inclusions of moderate size, which are easy to see under 10x and sometimes visible to the unaided eye. Thery are still non-damaging.

Typical inclusions: liquid inclusions, fingerprints, small chips, small feathers, moderate color zoning and clouds.

* SI1 -SI2 - Slightly Included: Characterized by OBVIOUS inclusions, which are large and/ or numerous under 10x. In SI1 they are apparent, and in SI2 very apparent to the unaided eye.

Typical Inclusions:large included crystals, moderate feathers, large chips, considerable color zoning and dense clouds.

* I1-I2-I3-Imperfect: Characterized by inclusions that may have a negative effect on either appearance or durability or both. In I1 there is moderate effect on either factor; In I2 a severe effect on either factor; In I3 a severe effect on both factors. Inclusions are often large and prominent to the unaided eye and there may be noticeable loss of transparency.

* Dcl-De'classe': Characterized by inclusions so numerous the entire stone is no longer transparent but translucent at best. Dcl stones lack the beauty and\or durability of faceted gemstones.

Type III Clarity Grades

* VVS - Very,Very Slightly Included: Characterized by NOTICEABLE inclusions, which are easy to see under 10x but usually invisible to the unaided eye.

Typical inclusions: small included crystals, liquid inclusions, fine needles and tiny feathers.

* VS - Very Slightly Included: Characterized by OBVIOUS inclusions which are very easy to see under 10x and are often visible to the unaided eye.

Typical inclusions: liquid inclusions, fingerprints, chips and small feathers.

* SI1 -SI2 - Slightly Included: Characterized by PROMINENT inclusions, which are large and numerous under 10x. In SI1 they are prominent and in SI2 very prominent to the unaided eye.

Typical Inclusions:easily visible but not extensive feathers and dense clouds.

* I1-I2-I3-Imperfect: Characterized by inclusions that have a negative effect on appearance or durability, or both. In I1 there is a moderate effect on either factor; in I2 a severe effect on either factor; in I3 a severe effect on both factors. Inclusions are often large and prominent to the unaided eye and there may be noticeable loss of transparency.

* Dcl-De'classe': Characterized by inclusions so numerous the entire stone is no longer transparent but translucent at best. Dcl stones lack the beauty and\or durability of faceted gemstones.

As you can see colored gemstone grading is slightly more difficult than Diamond grading.

Just try to avoid colored (or uncolored for that matter) gemstones with large black inclusions that detract from the stones beauty. For the most part, use your common sense. You know in your heart when you are looking at a nicely colored gemstone. If you have to ask yourself, then you probably are not!
Please visit these websites for more information about colored gemstones and grading:
http://www.gemaffair.com/content/Gemstone_Grading.htm
http://www.thenaturalsapphirecompany.com/Sapphires/Education/Grading/

Info on Glacier blue topaz-
http://www.earthstreasure.com/Blue-Topaz-Jewelry.html
http://www.awesomegems.com/topaz-blue.html
http://www.modernjeweler.com/publication/article.jsp?pubId=1&id=312

Payment

If you want an item and can't pay immediately please convo me and I can set up a reserve for you. Please pay for your reserve within 1 week. Thanks. I accept payment through PayPal, major credit cards, or equal trade in hedgehogfibres yarn (www.hedgehogfibres.etsy.com)
CUSTOM stone requests require payment in full before manufacturing begins. The lead time is around 2-3 weeks for custom stone requests. ALL custom requests are non-refundable but can be returned for a store credit.

Shipping

I try to ship all orders out within two days of receipt of payment. The shipping days for the shop are Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Saturdays. For US orders, if your shipping cost is $5 or more I will send it priority mail, otherwise it goes first class.

International orders are a bit trickier, but I generally ship first class. If you are concerned about delivery issues in your country, your shipment can be mailed certified mail. Please contact me about the country specific charge for this service. For international orders, the cost of shipping is for the postage ONLY. It does not cover any customs duties that may need to be paid.

Refunds and Exchanges

I want all of my customers to be happy. If you are dissatisfied with your purchase please return it for an store credit or refund - minus shipping charges. Store credit will be issued for ALL custom orders and returns for aesthetic issues. Refunds will be given for quality issues only.

Additional Policies and FAQs

The pictures that I take are of the actual stones used to fill your order. While every effort is made to ensure correctness of color, there will be some slight variation depending on the monitor.
***I will NOT leave feedback unless requested to do so.***

Last Updated January 21, 2015