RussianEthnicAndMore

Russian Gifts,Clothing,Weaving,Knitting,Purses and more

Charlotte, North Carolina · 17 Sales

RussianEthnicAndMore

Russian Gifts,Clothing,Weaving,Knitting,Purses and more

Charlotte, North Carolina 17 Sales On Etsy since 2011

0 out of 5 stars
(9)

Announcement   Welcome to my shop where you will find native Russian-style gifts,clothing and accessories. Also I can offer some things not related to the Great Russian culture.

All my clothing, which I indicate as interpetation of costume, are made as authentic as possible, using only suitable for each style of the dress fabrics. Although it is still interpretation. Why? I want to be honest with customers. Explanation follows.

My goal is to make costumes which are as true to real ones as possible to show the real-- not fake --beauty of my ancestors' rich heritage.
What you typically see on stages is purposely made to look nice only from a distance and to be made cheaply and quickly; that is why it holds only some general similarities to real native Russian costumes. Also the image of traditional Russian costume was and is purposely distorted. Of course there are ensembles who sing authentic music wearing real clothing or reconstructions, but you do not often see them on big stages. The typical stage costume is based on a few elements to give a general idea about Russian costume without detailed indication of a region. In real life the costume of different parts of Russia has its own unique features not really reflected in stage costume. Soviet Folk costume is its own history, but if you want a dress which could have actually be warn by our ancestors, the stage costume is not an answer.

Each dress and shirt here is created based on Russian tradition of the second part of 19th and the beginning of 20th century, as anything before that period made from prints (fabrics) cannot be guaranteed to be ethnographically authentic. When the prints (fabrics) finally came into village life, they brought new designs and look to the tradition. Sarafans (sundresses) primarily were worn in Northern and Middle Russia and only occasionally in the South where, instead of sarafans, women wore more archaic clothing called "poneva" --- kind of a skirt. I make costumes of peasants( because they are those, who keep thradition), and rich peasants( may sound strange, but such were numerous). There was no slavery in the Russian North and Siberia, their costumes are made with silk, brocade, river pearls. A festive dress looks richer, than a queen's dress. In the South, where people were enslaved for about 300 years, peasants still made their festive dresses with so much embroidery which added a rich look to their home made fabrics(linen, flax, woolen,nettle, hem)

The traditional view of a woman’s beauty is that she should look shapely. Being skinny was viewed as unhealthy and unattractive. That's why these costumes are meant to highlight a woman's femininity, her fullness, so that she can be viewed as healthy and fertile in order to attract a mate. The traditional Russian sarafans are cut in a way that make a woman feel stately and full of energy, and they can be worn on all body types.

I sew sarafans primarily based on traditional Northern Russia (in particular, the Vologda region), Middle Russia (the Novgorod and Nizhniy Novgorod region) as well as a type based on certain ethnic Russian groups who inhabit Siberia. The clothing I create is an INTERPRETATION of the aforementioned costumes and can be worn for any or no occasion --- just because they are pretty and comfy.

Why do I not create truly ethnographically accurate costumes? Because the fabrics I use are contemporary, and calling them 100 percent ethnographically accurate would be misleading. However, when choosing the fabric for any particular sarafan, I try to follow the idea of the original costume, and all my creations have their own prototypes. Also to create a full ethnographical costume is many months' work. Sewing a sarafan is easy if made with the help of a sewing machine(true only for ethnographical clothing dating not earlier than the end of 19th century) But the costume is not complete without a shirt, which was only hand-embroidered, never on canvas, but on the original fabrics. Or they could weave their designs and sew it into the shirts, which was also very time-consuming. Trim was not used on such shirts, because embroidery gave the shirt its identity and was connected to mythology. Although latest shirts(19th-beginning of 20th century) could be made with printed fabrics which were not home-made. They do not always require embroidery, just decoration(in such shirts trims were OK, but only on edges around necks and hands.)

The cut and sewing of the sarafans and shirts are fully traditional. What I mix in are the details. Before television and internet, each village had little information about neighboring regions, and each detail was exclusive to each village. Now, however, exchange of information and details makes it easier to mix the decor across regions without looking unnatural.
When I combine details, I always attempt to take them from regions that are close to one another and borrowed ideas from one another. I believe this is the only way traditional Russian style, unique in its beauty, can exist in contemporary life (and not just folklore in festivals).

The shirts I make for my sarafans are made from contemporary fabrics, decorated with laces and trims(for some style only). The prototype of these type of shirts appeared early in the 20th century, when mythology in embroidery began to disappear. I also create more elaborate embroidered shirts based on the regions of Russia listed above, although making them can take a few weeks.

A sarafan, almost without exception, MUST be worn with a belt. The exception would be sarafans from very expensive brocades and silks (although under it there would be a belt). I hand-weave my belts according to tradition with original Russian designs which are so ancient that details of these designs exist all over the world. To create this belt takes more than a week because the process is very laborious. There is an easier and less expensive way to create authentic belts, but they are less festive.

A tiny purse traditionally was worn on the belt. It's called a "Lakomnik" (name refers to the treats girls put in this purse). In the contemporary world, this purse can accommodate a cell phone, keys, a wallet and other small items.

Things Russian women wore on the heads I do not make yet because to make an authentic festive headpiece requires too much embroidery and time. There is a great difference between head stuff of married and unmarried. Kokoshnik( you often see it on stages),kichka, soroka, borushka -only a few of possioble things worn by a married woman, whose hair must be completely hidden( for magical reasons).In absence of these women could wear a head scarf, which often was used with many things mentioned above.
Girls' hair is a pride, she would show it an drecorate with ribbons and embroidered endings( kosnik). Richer girls wore crown-looking headpieces which were open on top ( also for magical reasons).

The traditional knitting is well-known among all Indo-European nations and others. I create things in this manner (socks, sweaters, hats and mittens).
The patterns I use for embroidery and knitting are authentic, taken from books on traditional Russian folk costume and art.

I also make shirts in Ukrainian style (just the style, not ethnography!) and some other handmade things, which you can see on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/SvetlanaVRomanova and http://vk.com/id6596141

TO ORDER:
Everything I have on display can be created by special order, either separately or as a complete costume. Changes in details can be discussed before order is finalized.
I only require a few measurements, which can be supplied at the time of order.

Thank you

Announcement

Last updated on May 11, 2016

Welcome to my shop where you will find native Russian-style gifts,clothing and accessories. Also I can offer some things not related to the Great Russian culture.

All my clothing, which I indicate as interpetation of costume, are made as authentic as possible, using only suitable for each style of the dress fabrics. Although it is still interpretation. Why? I want to be honest with customers. Explanation follows.

My goal is to make costumes which are as true to real ones as possible to show the real-- not fake --beauty of my ancestors' rich heritage.
What you typically see on stages is purposely made to look nice only from a distance and to be made cheaply and quickly; that is why it holds only some general similarities to real native Russian costumes. Also the image of traditional Russian costume was and is purposely distorted. Of course there are ensembles who sing authentic music wearing real clothing or reconstructions, but you do not often see them on big stages. The typical stage costume is based on a few elements to give a general idea about Russian costume without detailed indication of a region. In real life the costume of different parts of Russia has its own unique features not really reflected in stage costume. Soviet Folk costume is its own history, but if you want a dress which could have actually be warn by our ancestors, the stage costume is not an answer.

Each dress and shirt here is created based on Russian tradition of the second part of 19th and the beginning of 20th century, as anything before that period made from prints (fabrics) cannot be guaranteed to be ethnographically authentic. When the prints (fabrics) finally came into village life, they brought new designs and look to the tradition. Sarafans (sundresses) primarily were worn in Northern and Middle Russia and only occasionally in the South where, instead of sarafans, women wore more archaic clothing called "poneva" --- kind of a skirt. I make costumes of peasants( because they are those, who keep thradition), and rich peasants( may sound strange, but such were numerous). There was no slavery in the Russian North and Siberia, their costumes are made with silk, brocade, river pearls. A festive dress looks richer, than a queen's dress. In the South, where people were enslaved for about 300 years, peasants still made their festive dresses with so much embroidery which added a rich look to their home made fabrics(linen, flax, woolen,nettle, hem)

The traditional view of a woman’s beauty is that she should look shapely. Being skinny was viewed as unhealthy and unattractive. That's why these costumes are meant to highlight a woman's femininity, her fullness, so that she can be viewed as healthy and fertile in order to attract a mate. The traditional Russian sarafans are cut in a way that make a woman feel stately and full of energy, and they can be worn on all body types.

I sew sarafans primarily based on traditional Northern Russia (in particular, the Vologda region), Middle Russia (the Novgorod and Nizhniy Novgorod region) as well as a type based on certain ethnic Russian groups who inhabit Siberia. The clothing I create is an INTERPRETATION of the aforementioned costumes and can be worn for any or no occasion --- just because they are pretty and comfy.

Why do I not create truly ethnographically accurate costumes? Because the fabrics I use are contemporary, and calling them 100 percent ethnographically accurate would be misleading. However, when choosing the fabric for any particular sarafan, I try to follow the idea of the original costume, and all my creations have their own prototypes. Also to create a full ethnographical costume is many months' work. Sewing a sarafan is easy if made with the help of a sewing machine(true only for ethnographical clothing dating not earlier than the end of 19th century) But the costume is not complete without a shirt, which was only hand-embroidered, never on canvas, but on the original fabrics. Or they could weave their designs and sew it into the shirts, which was also very time-consuming. Trim was not used on such shirts, because embroidery gave the shirt its identity and was connected to mythology. Although latest shirts(19th-beginning of 20th century) could be made with printed fabrics which were not home-made. They do not always require embroidery, just decoration(in such shirts trims were OK, but only on edges around necks and hands.)

The cut and sewing of the sarafans and shirts are fully traditional. What I mix in are the details. Before television and internet, each village had little information about neighboring regions, and each detail was exclusive to each village. Now, however, exchange of information and details makes it easier to mix the decor across regions without looking unnatural.
When I combine details, I always attempt to take them from regions that are close to one another and borrowed ideas from one another. I believe this is the only way traditional Russian style, unique in its beauty, can exist in contemporary life (and not just folklore in festivals).

The shirts I make for my sarafans are made from contemporary fabrics, decorated with laces and trims(for some style only). The prototype of these type of shirts appeared early in the 20th century, when mythology in embroidery began to disappear. I also create more elaborate embroidered shirts based on the regions of Russia listed above, although making them can take a few weeks.

A sarafan, almost without exception, MUST be worn with a belt. The exception would be sarafans from very expensive brocades and silks (although under it there would be a belt). I hand-weave my belts according to tradition with original Russian designs which are so ancient that details of these designs exist all over the world. To create this belt takes more than a week because the process is very laborious. There is an easier and less expensive way to create authentic belts, but they are less festive.

A tiny purse traditionally was worn on the belt. It's called a "Lakomnik" (name refers to the treats girls put in this purse). In the contemporary world, this purse can accommodate a cell phone, keys, a wallet and other small items.

Things Russian women wore on the heads I do not make yet because to make an authentic festive headpiece requires too much embroidery and time. There is a great difference between head stuff of married and unmarried. Kokoshnik( you often see it on stages),kichka, soroka, borushka -only a few of possioble things worn by a married woman, whose hair must be completely hidden( for magical reasons).In absence of these women could wear a head scarf, which often was used with many things mentioned above.
Girls' hair is a pride, she would show it an drecorate with ribbons and embroidered endings( kosnik). Richer girls wore crown-looking headpieces which were open on top ( also for magical reasons).

The traditional knitting is well-known among all Indo-European nations and others. I create things in this manner (socks, sweaters, hats and mittens).
The patterns I use for embroidery and knitting are authentic, taken from books on traditional Russian folk costume and art.

I also make shirts in Ukrainian style (just the style, not ethnography!) and some other handmade things, which you can see on Facebook at http://www.facebook.com/SvetlanaVRomanova and http://vk.com/id6596141

TO ORDER:
Everything I have on display can be created by special order, either separately or as a complete costume. Changes in details can be discussed before order is finalized.
I only require a few measurements, which can be supplied at the time of order.

Thank you

Svetlana Romanova

Contact shop owner

Svetlana Romanova

Reviews

No reviews in the last year
sbursak05

sbursak05 on Oct 28, 2015

5 out of 5 stars

Svetlana is a wonderful and hardworking. I requested the costume in about a week and she was able to deliver on time. It was great workmanship and great attention to the detail. My husband shirt was also hand sawn and great detail work. Belts for costumes were also made in less than week and looked very expertly done. Svetlana is very knowledgeable and talented seamstress. She was very easy to work with. Thank you Svetlana for authentic and professional work.

sbursak05

sbursak05 on Oct 28, 2015

5 out of 5 stars

Svetlana is a wonderful and hardworking. I requested the costume in about a week and she was able to deliver on time. It was great workmanship and great attention to the detail. My husband shirt was also hand sawn and great detail work. Belts for costumes were also made in less than week and looked very expertly done. Svetlana is very knowledgeable and talented seamstress. She was very easy to work with. Thank you Svetlana for authentic and professional work.

rvalta

rvalta on Jan 30, 2015

5 out of 5 stars

I would like to give more stars, five is simply not enough! I am REALLY happy with my new shirt and Svetlana is amazing, I cannot recommend her enough. She is really knowledgeable and really pleasant to work with. She even sent me pictures during planning since I needed a bit different shirt (my sarafan is following the Finnish tradition). I was not so good at explaining, but she understood me 100%. Thank you once more!

Hannah Deutsch

Hannah Deutsch on Dec 22, 2014

5 out of 5 stars

The sarafan I bought is wonderful and Svetlana is very easy to work with and does high quality work!

View all 9 reviews

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Last updated on June 12, 2011

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