ThuNguyenArtGallery

Asian Contemporary Art. Find it. Buy it. Love it.

Announcement    Welcome to Thu Nguyen Art Gallery! We specialize in affordable original fine art paintings for your home.
News alert: 4 of my paintings recently being collected by Standard Chartered Bank SCB in Beijing and Hong Kong China.
*You are buying an original painting that will last a lifetime from an artist whose paintings graced the wall of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC and other art museums across the USA.

about me:
April 1975: Everyone knows the communists will overrun Saigon, but no one expected it to happen so fast. Over the last month, the sound of gunfire and explosions have slowly increased in frequency and force. We are so used to it that it has become a sort of background noise no one pays any attention to. Despite this, I remember waking on April 30th, alarmed at how close the sound of gun fire and explosions was to our neighborhood. The city was in chaos, dark smoke blanketed the horizon as people ran with whatever belongings they could carry. But as I watched it seemed that very few had any idea of where to go. My family and I hurriedly packed some clothes and fled to a friend's house in another part of the city called Cho-Lon which was safer. We could no longer stay in our home because it was near an army camp and therefore dangerous. My father was not with us because he and my mother had separated years earlier. Adding to our anxiety was a rumor that the communists have threatened to flatten Saigon if there is resistance. By noon the presidential palace had fallen and we knew it was all over. I was only 7 years old at the time and did not realize how bad the situation was, so I innocently told my mom that now Vietnam will be one country again so she can go back to North Vietnam to see grandmother. My mom was delighted with the thought. Later that afternoon we drove to the harbor to see what was going on since the radio station had been captured by the communist and we no longer were getting any news. As we drove around the streets were now completely deserted and a strange silence had fallen on the city. The only people we saw were a few people left still burning records and documents in front of some government and military installations. More ominous was the fact that in the harbor most of the navy and merchant ships had already left. I asked my mom what was going on but she seemed lost in her thoughts, maybe she was thinking of the harsh choice she would soon have to make. My uncle and his wife had been staying one step ahead of the communists since they fled the central highlands. Because of the speed of the communist advance, the roads were jammed with refugees fleeing south making progress impossible for vehicles. Even though they did not want to be separated, my uncle was forced to put his wife on one of the boats heading to Saigon because she was pregnant and would never be able to keep up on foot. When he finally made it to Saigon a few weeks later, he found out that his wife has not arrived and not knowing where she was or what else to do, decided to stay with us in hope that she would find him. Later we learned that the boat she was on had unexpectedly dropped everyone, including his wife, off at Cam Ranh Bay (another city in the central highlands) to go back north for more refugees. My poor aunt was unable to find a way to get to Saigon until after the fighting was over and escape was impossible. Meanwhile, for the rest of us, time was running out. We knew that if we were going to leave it had to be now. We waved down one of the few remaining navy boats which was headed out to sea but stopped to pick us up. At this time not everyone was willing to escape by boat so while it was crowded, there was none of the panic and fighting such as I saw in the photos taken at the American Embassy that day as the last helicopters were leaving. The gunfire was getting closer and my uncle was torn between staying to look for his wife and escaping, he was worried that he and his wife would face retribution if he stayed because he had been in the army. My mother was hesitant to get on board because she had to choose between leaving with us or staying so that she could see her mother for the first time since 1954 when north and south Vietnam were separated. Finally, she decided to stay and promised to find us after the war ended. As the boat pulled away I can still remember my mother standing on the dock, crying and waving to us. I was yelling: "Stop the boat, go back and get my mom", but it was too late. In those few minutes, my family has torn apart and for the last time, I saw Vietnam. As my mother watched the boat leaving with her children she was overcome with grief and changed her mind. Desperately she stood at the dock for five hours waiting for another boat to take her out to our ship, but none came. On the way out of Saigon, we saw hundreds of returning boats and some of them warned us not to go on because troops were shooting at any boats trying to escape to the open sea. The people on our boat were very determined and decided to take their chances and leave. Many of the boats we saw leaving were severely overloaded and one of the ships had run aground in shallow water. Our smaller boat pulled alongside the old, rust-streaked ship and an agreement was reached that everyone who wanted to could transfer from our boat to the ship, and in return, our boat would help pull the ship into deeper water. After struggling for three or four hours both vessels finally reached deep water and all passengers were transferred. The small boat turned back toward Saigon, taking a few people who had changed their minds and decided to go back. The ship, even more, overcrowded than before slowly headed out to the open ocean for the long dangerous voyage ahead. Even though we had made it out of Saigon there was no celebrating, everyone was dwelling on what they had left behind and what the uncertain future would hold. That night was pitch black, there were no lights on our ship or onshore. We watched fireworks shooting up from the coastal villages into the dark sky. The communists were celebrating their victory and we could hear one of the generals broadcasting a new set of rules which he called " the ten commandments ". These commandments were to govern life for those left behind in the new Vietnam. Our intended destination was Singapore and we slowly headed south. The weather was good and if it were not for the grim circumstances I might have been able to appreciate the beauty of the blue ocean and the small islands we passed. Once we saw some whales which terrified everyone because they were nearly as large as our ship and came very close. When I look back on the event, I think that everyone leaning over one side to watch the whales were more dangerous to the ship than the whales themselves. Things started to go seriously wrong a couple of days into the journey when our engine broke down. I guess this was not very surprising considering how old and decrepit our ship was to start with. There were many more small boats from coastal villages that followed us and dumping refugees onto our ship each day. The water started to coming in from an existing hole on the side of the hull of our ship which is now below the waterline because of the refugees' weight. After drifting a few days, our food and water were running out, making an already bad situation very desperate. People started to fight over food and water. Everyone was being very careful to ration their water and food except for this popular singer from Saigon who would use a great deal of her small supply of water to wash her face each day. Obviously, some people are more afraid of being unattractive than dying. Everyone thought that we were going to die slowly and horribly, despair settled over the ship like a numbing fog. A man near me decided not to wait and shot himself in the head. I remember screaming when his blood and brain tissue splattering on me. On the crowded deck, there was nowhere to store the body so there was no choice but to toss his body overboard and within minutes the sharks were fighting over it. As days passed, so great was my fear and loss that I felt neither hunger nor thirst. My mind had cut off my ability to feel or comprehend what was happening around me, which was maybe a good thing considering what life was like onboard. Even though the ship was extremely overcrowded there was very little talking, everyone seemed wrapped up in their own misery. My brother and sister sat nearby crying and hugging each other. The crowding was so great that one night when I stood up to stretch, I found that I could no longer find a space to sit back down so I ended up standing the entire night until I collapsed. Having learned my lesson I did not get up again until we were rescued. Despite our SOS signals and desperate attempts to get their attention, many ships passed us by without stopping but finally, after floating what seemed like forever we were picked up by a Danish freighter out of Thailand on their way to Hong Kong. After being left by so many other ships, everyone was afraid that if we did not get on board the freighter fast enough they would leave without us. Most of the people started to panic and there was a lot of pushing and shoving to get on board. Some fights even broke out and many passengers left their personal belongings behind in the mad rush. One man's leg got crushed between the two ships when they collided with each other. Many others fell into the water and drowned during the rescue. By the time we were rescued, I could not move my legs because of sitting in one spot for so long; I had to be carried up to the freighter by one of the ship's crew. That night as I was resting from my ordeal someone stole all the cash and jewelry that my mother had given me. So when it was over all I had left of Vietnam were memories of people and places that had been left behind. For many years afterward, I would get angry when I thought about what had happened and what I lost. I was not angry at anyone, in particular, rather I was angry about how events and ideologies which I did not understand could take me from everything I knew and loved.

Explore our compelling portraits, landscape, and floral paintings.
BUY IT. FRAME IT. LOVE IT.

My gallery is located in Kamuela just 10 minutes from Spencer Beach and is open by appointment, please call me at 808-775-0360 to schedule your visit. Mahalo

Portrait commission accepted

Prints on demand: greeting card, household items, phone cases, T-shirt, etc. available at:
https://thu-nguyen.pixels.com/

EXHIBITIONS:

2022
ViewPoint 54, sponsored by Cincinnati Art Club, Eisele Gallery, Cincinnati, OH
Realism Today - Pickens County Museum of Art, Pickens, SC
Proud To Be Seen - Bruce Baughman Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Tubac Center of the Arts, Tubac, AZ
I Figure: Contemporary Figurative Art - Arts Benicia, Benicia, CA
50 and Older Exhibition - Las Laguna Art Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA
2022 National Fine Art Show - Lincoln Gallery, Loveland, CO
16th Annual Emerald Spring Exhibition 2022 - Emerald Art Center 500 Main St Springfield, OR
"61st Stockton Art League Juried Exhibition" at The Haggin Museum Stockton, CA (sponsored by Stockton Art League)
"About Face" - Webster Arts, Webster Groves MO
"Love is in the air" - The Contemporary at Northern Waters Resort, Watersmeet, MI
37th Annual International Exhibition - The University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler TX Juried Group Show

2021
"Holiday Small Works Show" - Kansas City Stockyards Gallery, Kansas City, MO Juried Group Show
"INSIGHTS IV Art Exhibition" - Zolla Lieberman Gallery, Chicago, IL. Juried Group Show
Lore Degenstein Gallery's 12th Annual Figurative Drawing and Painting Exhibition- Lore Degenstein Gallery, Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA Juried Group Show
Viewpoint 53 - Cincinnati Art Club, hosted by Art Design Consultants, Cincinnati, Ohio
2021 Louisville Art Association National Fine Art Show - Louisville Art Association, Louisville, CO
2021 Art Ability at Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital - Art Ability at Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital, Malvern, PA
TRAHC's 33rd Annual Juried Exhibition, The Texarkana Regional Arts & Humanities Council, Texarkana Texas
Lakeland Art Guild 49th Annual Melvin Gallery Art Exhibition, Lakeland, FL
MidSummer Art Celebration 4th Annual All Media Juried Exhibit - Wailoa Center, Hilo, HI
Women's Work - Indianapolis Art Center, Indianapolis, IN
34th September Competition - Alexandria Museum of Art, Alexandria, LA
Providence Art Club National Open Juried Exhibition 2021 - Providence Art Club, Providence, RI
2021 National Fine Art Show - Lincoln Gallery, Loveland, Colorado
"Small Works" - The Rice Gallery of Fine Art, Overland Park Kansas
"Reflection - Women in Art" - Nuu Muse Contemporary Art, Dallas Texas
Figure It Out - 120ART,Taylor, TX

2020
Group show at Hilliard Gallery, Kansas City, MO
2020 Bank of the Arts National Juried Exhibition - Craven Arts Council & Gallery,New Bern, NC
33rd September Competition - Alexandria Museum of Art, Alexandria, LA
Taos Insurgency 2020 - Greg Moon Art,Taos, NM
Dallas Metro Arts Contemporary - 2D National Juried Exhibition, Plano TX
15th Annual Emerald Spring Painting Exhibition 2020 - Emerald Art Center, Springfield, OR
Providence Art Club National Open Juried Exhibition- Providence Art Club, Providence, RI AWARD OF MERIT
North x Northwest Exhibition: Women’s Work - Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana
Contemporary Figurative Show - Hilliard Gallery, Kansas City, MO
Art of Possibilities - Art Show and Sale, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, Golden Valley MN
Go Figure - SAA Collective Gallery, Springfield IL Second Place Award
FALC 25th Annual Juried Exhibition- Page-Walker Arts and History Center, Cary NC
Nude Nite - Tampa 2020, Tampa FL
Core New Art Space: Mixed Media - Lakewood, CO
Artist's Vision - Marin Society of Artists, San Rafael, CA
Valdosta National 2020, Valdosta State University, Dedo Maranville Fine Arts Gallery, Valdosta, GA
The Self-Portrait - University of North Carolina Wilmington, NC

2019
The Us Show - Blue Line Arts, Roseville, CA
Changes - D'Art Gallery, Denver, CO
Arts Council of Wayne County 40th National Juried Art Show, Goldsboro, NC
In Gold We Trust - Art on 30th, San Diego, CA
November group show - Jones Gallery, Kansas City, MO
Zolla/Lieberman Gallery in Chicago
40th National Juried Art Show - Arts Council of Wayne County, Goldsboro, NC
64 ARTS - Buchanan Center for the Arts, Monmouth, IL
Schwa Show National Juried Exhibition - Emerge Gallery & Art Center, Greenville, NC
New Directions 2019 - Barrett Art Center/DCAA, Poughkeepsie, NY
Art Ability 2019 at Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital, Malvern, PA
2019 California Open Exhibition - TAG Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
"Strive: An Exhibition Highlighting American Immigration & the American Dream" - d'Art Center, Norfolk, VA. Juried group show
"Children's Mercy Hospital Benefit Art Show" - Jones Gallery, Kansas City, MO. Juried group show
"DART for ART" - Crooked Tree Arts Center, Petoskey MI. Juried Group Show
"All the Best" - South Wind Art Gallery, Topeka, KS. Juried Group Show
"INSIGHTS III Art Exhibition" - Zolla Lieberman Gallery, Chicago, IL. Juried Group Show
MidSummer Art Celebration 2019 - 2nd Annual All Media Juried Exhibit - WAILOA CENTER, Hilo Hawaii. Juried group show
"Ronald McDonald House Benefit Art Show" - Jones Gallery, Kansas City, MO. Juried group show
Solo show - Thu Nguyen Art Gallery, Kamuela Hawaii

*Painting is a way of communicating and revealing the individual truths of the artist. The most powerful paintings are those that tell a story and leave you with a sense of wonder and mystery. They provoke you to feel and furthermore act. This lingering sensation is the magic of Art. It is where the two-dimensional painting gives way to a world of imagination. These stories can encompass emotions and feelings or explore the personal ideals of its creator. They can harbor deeply rooted frustrations or exemplify the most beautiful vistas of the artist’s world. It is at this moment, that artistry bridges the gap of physical with spiritual and unlocks the power of the conceptual mind. For those brave enough to challenge themselves with the artistic journey, whether as creator or patron, they are granted an unparalleled view into the heart of the universe, the birthplace of the astounding.

Announcement

Last updated on Aug 6, 2022

Welcome to Thu Nguyen Art Gallery! We specialize in affordable original fine art paintings for your home.
News alert: 4 of my paintings recently being collected by Standard Chartered Bank SCB in Beijing and Hong Kong China.
*You are buying an original painting that will last a lifetime from an artist whose paintings graced the wall of the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC and other art museums across the USA.

about me:
April 1975: Everyone knows the communists will overrun Saigon, but no one expected it to happen so fast. Over the last month, the sound of gunfire and explosions have slowly increased in frequency and force. We are so used to it that it has become a sort of background noise no one pays any attention to. Despite this, I remember waking on April 30th, alarmed at how close the sound of gun fire and explosions was to our neighborhood. The city was in chaos, dark smoke blanketed the horizon as people ran with whatever belongings they could carry. But as I watched it seemed that very few had any idea of where to go. My family and I hurriedly packed some clothes and fled to a friend's house in another part of the city called Cho-Lon which was safer. We could no longer stay in our home because it was near an army camp and therefore dangerous. My father was not with us because he and my mother had separated years earlier. Adding to our anxiety was a rumor that the communists have threatened to flatten Saigon if there is resistance. By noon the presidential palace had fallen and we knew it was all over. I was only 7 years old at the time and did not realize how bad the situation was, so I innocently told my mom that now Vietnam will be one country again so she can go back to North Vietnam to see grandmother. My mom was delighted with the thought. Later that afternoon we drove to the harbor to see what was going on since the radio station had been captured by the communist and we no longer were getting any news. As we drove around the streets were now completely deserted and a strange silence had fallen on the city. The only people we saw were a few people left still burning records and documents in front of some government and military installations. More ominous was the fact that in the harbor most of the navy and merchant ships had already left. I asked my mom what was going on but she seemed lost in her thoughts, maybe she was thinking of the harsh choice she would soon have to make. My uncle and his wife had been staying one step ahead of the communists since they fled the central highlands. Because of the speed of the communist advance, the roads were jammed with refugees fleeing south making progress impossible for vehicles. Even though they did not want to be separated, my uncle was forced to put his wife on one of the boats heading to Saigon because she was pregnant and would never be able to keep up on foot. When he finally made it to Saigon a few weeks later, he found out that his wife has not arrived and not knowing where she was or what else to do, decided to stay with us in hope that she would find him. Later we learned that the boat she was on had unexpectedly dropped everyone, including his wife, off at Cam Ranh Bay (another city in the central highlands) to go back north for more refugees. My poor aunt was unable to find a way to get to Saigon until after the fighting was over and escape was impossible. Meanwhile, for the rest of us, time was running out. We knew that if we were going to leave it had to be now. We waved down one of the few remaining navy boats which was headed out to sea but stopped to pick us up. At this time not everyone was willing to escape by boat so while it was crowded, there was none of the panic and fighting such as I saw in the photos taken at the American Embassy that day as the last helicopters were leaving. The gunfire was getting closer and my uncle was torn between staying to look for his wife and escaping, he was worried that he and his wife would face retribution if he stayed because he had been in the army. My mother was hesitant to get on board because she had to choose between leaving with us or staying so that she could see her mother for the first time since 1954 when north and south Vietnam were separated. Finally, she decided to stay and promised to find us after the war ended. As the boat pulled away I can still remember my mother standing on the dock, crying and waving to us. I was yelling: "Stop the boat, go back and get my mom", but it was too late. In those few minutes, my family has torn apart and for the last time, I saw Vietnam. As my mother watched the boat leaving with her children she was overcome with grief and changed her mind. Desperately she stood at the dock for five hours waiting for another boat to take her out to our ship, but none came. On the way out of Saigon, we saw hundreds of returning boats and some of them warned us not to go on because troops were shooting at any boats trying to escape to the open sea. The people on our boat were very determined and decided to take their chances and leave. Many of the boats we saw leaving were severely overloaded and one of the ships had run aground in shallow water. Our smaller boat pulled alongside the old, rust-streaked ship and an agreement was reached that everyone who wanted to could transfer from our boat to the ship, and in return, our boat would help pull the ship into deeper water. After struggling for three or four hours both vessels finally reached deep water and all passengers were transferred. The small boat turned back toward Saigon, taking a few people who had changed their minds and decided to go back. The ship, even more, overcrowded than before slowly headed out to the open ocean for the long dangerous voyage ahead. Even though we had made it out of Saigon there was no celebrating, everyone was dwelling on what they had left behind and what the uncertain future would hold. That night was pitch black, there were no lights on our ship or onshore. We watched fireworks shooting up from the coastal villages into the dark sky. The communists were celebrating their victory and we could hear one of the generals broadcasting a new set of rules which he called " the ten commandments ". These commandments were to govern life for those left behind in the new Vietnam. Our intended destination was Singapore and we slowly headed south. The weather was good and if it were not for the grim circumstances I might have been able to appreciate the beauty of the blue ocean and the small islands we passed. Once we saw some whales which terrified everyone because they were nearly as large as our ship and came very close. When I look back on the event, I think that everyone leaning over one side to watch the whales were more dangerous to the ship than the whales themselves. Things started to go seriously wrong a couple of days into the journey when our engine broke down. I guess this was not very surprising considering how old and decrepit our ship was to start with. There were many more small boats from coastal villages that followed us and dumping refugees onto our ship each day. The water started to coming in from an existing hole on the side of the hull of our ship which is now below the waterline because of the refugees' weight. After drifting a few days, our food and water were running out, making an already bad situation very desperate. People started to fight over food and water. Everyone was being very careful to ration their water and food except for this popular singer from Saigon who would use a great deal of her small supply of water to wash her face each day. Obviously, some people are more afraid of being unattractive than dying. Everyone thought that we were going to die slowly and horribly, despair settled over the ship like a numbing fog. A man near me decided not to wait and shot himself in the head. I remember screaming when his blood and brain tissue splattering on me. On the crowded deck, there was nowhere to store the body so there was no choice but to toss his body overboard and within minutes the sharks were fighting over it. As days passed, so great was my fear and loss that I felt neither hunger nor thirst. My mind had cut off my ability to feel or comprehend what was happening around me, which was maybe a good thing considering what life was like onboard. Even though the ship was extremely overcrowded there was very little talking, everyone seemed wrapped up in their own misery. My brother and sister sat nearby crying and hugging each other. The crowding was so great that one night when I stood up to stretch, I found that I could no longer find a space to sit back down so I ended up standing the entire night until I collapsed. Having learned my lesson I did not get up again until we were rescued. Despite our SOS signals and desperate attempts to get their attention, many ships passed us by without stopping but finally, after floating what seemed like forever we were picked up by a Danish freighter out of Thailand on their way to Hong Kong. After being left by so many other ships, everyone was afraid that if we did not get on board the freighter fast enough they would leave without us. Most of the people started to panic and there was a lot of pushing and shoving to get on board. Some fights even broke out and many passengers left their personal belongings behind in the mad rush. One man's leg got crushed between the two ships when they collided with each other. Many others fell into the water and drowned during the rescue. By the time we were rescued, I could not move my legs because of sitting in one spot for so long; I had to be carried up to the freighter by one of the ship's crew. That night as I was resting from my ordeal someone stole all the cash and jewelry that my mother had given me. So when it was over all I had left of Vietnam were memories of people and places that had been left behind. For many years afterward, I would get angry when I thought about what had happened and what I lost. I was not angry at anyone, in particular, rather I was angry about how events and ideologies which I did not understand could take me from everything I knew and loved.

Explore our compelling portraits, landscape, and floral paintings.
BUY IT. FRAME IT. LOVE IT.

My gallery is located in Kamuela just 10 minutes from Spencer Beach and is open by appointment, please call me at 808-775-0360 to schedule your visit. Mahalo

Portrait commission accepted

Prints on demand: greeting card, household items, phone cases, T-shirt, etc. available at:
https://thu-nguyen.pixels.com/

EXHIBITIONS:

2022
ViewPoint 54, sponsored by Cincinnati Art Club, Eisele Gallery, Cincinnati, OH
Realism Today - Pickens County Museum of Art, Pickens, SC
Proud To Be Seen - Bruce Baughman Studio and Gallery, sponsored by Tubac Center of the Arts, Tubac, AZ
I Figure: Contemporary Figurative Art - Arts Benicia, Benicia, CA
50 and Older Exhibition - Las Laguna Art Gallery, Laguna Beach, CA
2022 National Fine Art Show - Lincoln Gallery, Loveland, CO
16th Annual Emerald Spring Exhibition 2022 - Emerald Art Center 500 Main St Springfield, OR
"61st Stockton Art League Juried Exhibition" at The Haggin Museum Stockton, CA (sponsored by Stockton Art League)
"About Face" - Webster Arts, Webster Groves MO
"Love is in the air" - The Contemporary at Northern Waters Resort, Watersmeet, MI
37th Annual International Exhibition - The University of Texas at Tyler, Tyler TX Juried Group Show

2021
"Holiday Small Works Show" - Kansas City Stockyards Gallery, Kansas City, MO Juried Group Show
"INSIGHTS IV Art Exhibition" - Zolla Lieberman Gallery, Chicago, IL. Juried Group Show
Lore Degenstein Gallery's 12th Annual Figurative Drawing and Painting Exhibition- Lore Degenstein Gallery, Susquehanna University, Selinsgrove, PA Juried Group Show
Viewpoint 53 - Cincinnati Art Club, hosted by Art Design Consultants, Cincinnati, Ohio
2021 Louisville Art Association National Fine Art Show - Louisville Art Association, Louisville, CO
2021 Art Ability at Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital - Art Ability at Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital, Malvern, PA
TRAHC's 33rd Annual Juried Exhibition, The Texarkana Regional Arts & Humanities Council, Texarkana Texas
Lakeland Art Guild 49th Annual Melvin Gallery Art Exhibition, Lakeland, FL
MidSummer Art Celebration 4th Annual All Media Juried Exhibit - Wailoa Center, Hilo, HI
Women's Work - Indianapolis Art Center, Indianapolis, IN
34th September Competition - Alexandria Museum of Art, Alexandria, LA
Providence Art Club National Open Juried Exhibition 2021 - Providence Art Club, Providence, RI
2021 National Fine Art Show - Lincoln Gallery, Loveland, Colorado
"Small Works" - The Rice Gallery of Fine Art, Overland Park Kansas
"Reflection - Women in Art" - Nuu Muse Contemporary Art, Dallas Texas
Figure It Out - 120ART,Taylor, TX

2020
Group show at Hilliard Gallery, Kansas City, MO
2020 Bank of the Arts National Juried Exhibition - Craven Arts Council & Gallery,New Bern, NC
33rd September Competition - Alexandria Museum of Art, Alexandria, LA
Taos Insurgency 2020 - Greg Moon Art,Taos, NM
Dallas Metro Arts Contemporary - 2D National Juried Exhibition, Plano TX
15th Annual Emerald Spring Painting Exhibition 2020 - Emerald Art Center, Springfield, OR
Providence Art Club National Open Juried Exhibition- Providence Art Club, Providence, RI AWARD OF MERIT
North x Northwest Exhibition: Women’s Work - Yellowstone Art Museum, Billings, Montana
Contemporary Figurative Show - Hilliard Gallery, Kansas City, MO
Art of Possibilities - Art Show and Sale, Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute, Golden Valley MN
Go Figure - SAA Collective Gallery, Springfield IL Second Place Award
FALC 25th Annual Juried Exhibition- Page-Walker Arts and History Center, Cary NC
Nude Nite - Tampa 2020, Tampa FL
Core New Art Space: Mixed Media - Lakewood, CO
Artist's Vision - Marin Society of Artists, San Rafael, CA
Valdosta National 2020, Valdosta State University, Dedo Maranville Fine Arts Gallery, Valdosta, GA
The Self-Portrait - University of North Carolina Wilmington, NC

2019
The Us Show - Blue Line Arts, Roseville, CA
Changes - D'Art Gallery, Denver, CO
Arts Council of Wayne County 40th National Juried Art Show, Goldsboro, NC
In Gold We Trust - Art on 30th, San Diego, CA
November group show - Jones Gallery, Kansas City, MO
Zolla/Lieberman Gallery in Chicago
40th National Juried Art Show - Arts Council of Wayne County, Goldsboro, NC
64 ARTS - Buchanan Center for the Arts, Monmouth, IL
Schwa Show National Juried Exhibition - Emerge Gallery & Art Center, Greenville, NC
New Directions 2019 - Barrett Art Center/DCAA, Poughkeepsie, NY
Art Ability 2019 at Bryn Mawr Rehab Hospital, Malvern, PA
2019 California Open Exhibition - TAG Gallery, Los Angeles, CA
"Strive: An Exhibition Highlighting American Immigration & the American Dream" - d'Art Center, Norfolk, VA. Juried group show
"Children's Mercy Hospital Benefit Art Show" - Jones Gallery, Kansas City, MO. Juried group show
"DART for ART" - Crooked Tree Arts Center, Petoskey MI. Juried Group Show
"All the Best" - South Wind Art Gallery, Topeka, KS. Juried Group Show
"INSIGHTS III Art Exhibition" - Zolla Lieberman Gallery, Chicago, IL. Juried Group Show
MidSummer Art Celebration 2019 - 2nd Annual All Media Juried Exhibit - WAILOA CENTER, Hilo Hawaii. Juried group show
"Ronald McDonald House Benefit Art Show" - Jones Gallery, Kansas City, MO. Juried group show
Solo show - Thu Nguyen Art Gallery, Kamuela Hawaii

*Painting is a way of communicating and revealing the individual truths of the artist. The most powerful paintings are those that tell a story and leave you with a sense of wonder and mystery. They provoke you to feel and furthermore act. This lingering sensation is the magic of Art. It is where the two-dimensional painting gives way to a world of imagination. These stories can encompass emotions and feelings or explore the personal ideals of its creator. They can harbor deeply rooted frustrations or exemplify the most beautiful vistas of the artist’s world. It is at this moment, that artistry bridges the gap of physical with spiritual and unlocks the power of the conceptual mind. For those brave enough to challenge themselves with the artistic journey, whether as creator or patron, they are granted an unparalleled view into the heart of the universe, the birthplace of the astounding.

Items

Etsy automatically translates most text on the site to your preferred language.

See in original language

 

All Items

Etsy automatically translates most text on the site to your preferred language.

See in original language

Thu Nguyễn

Contact shop owner

Thu Nguyễn

Reviews

Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(2)

About ThuNguyenArtGallery

Sales 28
On Etsy since 2017

“For those two shoes you just bought you could buy a great painting and it would last a lot longer”

Thu Nguyen's Biography:

I was born in Saigon, Vietnam. Being very shy, I spent much of my childhood hiding away upstairs painting, instead of playing with other children. My first brush with success was a Best of Show prize at the 1974 children's exhibition in Saigon sponsored by UNICEF. In 1975 Saigon fell and in the resulting confusion I was separated from my parents. I ended up in a refuge camp near Hong Kong for a year prior to immigrating to the United States as an orphan. After one very snowy and cold winter in Pennsylvania, I went to Los Angeles to stay with some relatives.
During my high school years, I earned extra money doing fashion modeling work in the garment district and upon graduation started on the pre-med program in college. During this time I fell in love with art again and changed my major to art. While in college I had an acting stint in Hollywood on the side (I got a part in Oliver Stone's 'Heaven and Earth' and followed with a lead role in Elizabeth Hong Yang's 'Touch Within' in China).
After getting my art degree, I have since settled down to pursue my art career in Los Angeles, later Seattle and finally Hawaii with the big excitement being adopting my first daughter from China and my second daughter from Vietnam.

Professional qualifications:

BFA in painting, California State University Long Beach .
Two grants from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation
Three grants from the Elizabeth Greenshields Foundation.
My work is represented in many public and private collections in the U.S., Canada, Europe, and Mexico.

Current and Upcoming Exhibitions:

Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery (NPG) 2016 portrait competition exhibition (March 12, 2016 through January 8, 2017). It will then travel to five host museums across the country:

Tacoma Art Museum, WA
February 4, 2017 to May 14, 2017
 
Art Museum of South Texas, Corpus Christi, TX
June 2, 2017 to September 10, 2017
 
Kemper Museum of Contemporary Art, Kansas City, MO
October 8, 2017 to January 7, 2018
 
Artis—Naples, The Baker Museum, Naples, FL
January 31, 2018 to May 6, 2018
 
Ackland Museum of Art, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC
June 1, 2018 to August 26, 2018

Shop members

  • Thu Nguyễn

    Owner, Artist, Mother Of 2

    I was born in Saigon, Vietnam. In 1975 Saigon fell and I was separated from my parents. I immigrated to the United States as an orphan. After getting my art degree, I started to paint full time in Los Angeles,  later Seattle, and finally Hawaii.

  • Amélie-An

    Gallery's Artist

    Amélie-An is a special ed child with an exceptional talent for art. She was born in Can Tho South Vietnam in 2008.

  • Paul Ely

    Gallery's Artist

    Paul is a local artist here in Hawaii. He has been painting and exhibiting for 40 years. He also is represented by the Fountainhead Gallery in Seattle Washington.

  • Darlene Nguyễn

    Gallery's Artist

    Darlene Nguyen emigrated to Hawaii from Vietnam after the fall of Saigon in 1975. She is a disabled artist. She makes oil sketches/ Plein air paintings done on location all in on session.

Production partners

  • Amelie-An

    Hilo, HI

    Paintings are done by my youngest daughter Amelie-An. She is quite an exceptional artist. About Amelie-An: Amelie-An was born in Cần Thơ, South Vietnam in February 2008 under a very dim star. She was abandoned as an infant due to her medical problems which left her disfigured and mentally retarde

  • Darlene Nguyễn

    Hilo, HI

    about Darlene: she was born in Saigon Vietnam and emigrated to Hawaii in 1975 after the fall of Saigon. She is a disabled artist living with bipolar disorder.

  • Paul Ely

    Hilo, HI

    Paul is a local artist here in Hawaii. He has been painting for 40 years. His work is also be represented by the Gallery of Great Things in Waimea.

  • Thu Nguyễn

    Hilo, HI

    Thu Nguyen is a Vietnamese American artist who lives and works in Hawaii. Her portraits have been exhibited at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington DC

Shop policies