Announcement   Thank you to Etsy for allowing me to relist my sea otter fur handicrafts. Each of my items now includes information in the listing that specifies the sub-population of sea otters I use, which sub-population are neither threatened or endangered.

Announcement

Last updated on Feb 10, 2018

Thank you to Etsy for allowing me to relist my sea otter fur handicrafts. Each of my items now includes information in the listing that specifies the sub-population of sea otters I use, which sub-population are neither threatened or endangered.

Marcus Gho

Contact shop owner

Marcus Gho

Reviews

No reviews in the last year
  • wkwong78 on Feb 7, 2017

    4 out of 5 stars

    I like the fur. It's so soft.

  • marshallakamark on Jan 22, 2017

    5 out of 5 stars

    The shipping and handling were tremendous! The blanket is beautiful and exceeded my expectation - it is such a wonderful investment. I have also learned so much of the heritage of the Inupiaq and their care for sustainability. Marcus is phenomenal and I hope to buy more from him, as well as learn.

  • Daniel Sheradin on Jul 13, 2016

    5 out of 5 stars

    Fair Pricing, Excellent Craftsmanship, Fast communication, Quick turnaround on a custom ordered item.
    I met him in Juneau, discussed what I had in mind and it was shipped to my home just a few days later in North Carolina. Highly Recommended, I will be buying from him again.
    He definitely has a passion for what he makes. These were a gift for my wife who loves Alaska and Native Crafts, she has never been happier, actually cried when she opened the package. (no jewelry has ever done that)

View all 10 reviews

About

Sea otter

For some time now I have occasionally made Alaska Native art with ivory (walrus tusk), beads, moose hide, glass beads, stones, and other such materials. Most of my artwork was given to others, with enough sold to tourists, gift shops, and the UAF Museum to pay for materials. I love working with the materials used in creating Alaska Native art because it helps me feel closer to the land. Many of the materials come from the land and are only derived through relationships

When I moved to Juneau in 2006, some of my commercial fishermen friends encouraged me, as an Alaskan Native, to hunt sea otters. Because I don't hunt animals for sport, I politely declined.

In 2010, I changed careers and now work in fisheries management. Shortly thereafter, I applied and was accepted in a graduate fisheries program. After attending conferences, speaking to commercial fishermen, subsistence users, and personal use crabbers, I have come to the realization that the out of control sea otter population in Southeast Alaska is causing too many problems.

Sea otters eat the same food that people do, only a lot more of it. Here in Southeast, Alaska, they will grow to about 110 lbs., and they consume 20% - 30% of their body weight everyday. In Southeast Alaska, the sea otter population is growing exponentially and there are no natural predators. In the 1960s, the State of Alaska reintroduced 400 sea otters into Southeast Alaska. In the 1970s, the federal government assumed jurisdiction, and today there are approximately 30,000 sea otters in Southeast Alaska, and the population continues to grow.

About October of 2012, I begun with my plans to hunt sea otters. Through this journey, I've learned quite a bit about my grandparents. My grandfather was a fur trapper, and my grandmother a skin sewer, among many other things. When I look at pictures of my mother in her childhood - in spite of their 'poverty', during winter they were usually decked out in the most luxurious of furs. My grandmother's ancestor's have sewn with furs since time immemorial as well. When I sew fur, I feel my connection to my ancestors grow stronger. I've met several people along this journey, and while I have learned much I still have much more to learn.

I hope that you realize that when you buy sea otter fur, you are not only acquire an amazing piece of fur, but you are also supporting Alaska Native cultures.

Around the web

Shop members

  • Marcus

    Owner, Tuvaaq

    My name is Marcus J. Gho. The Inupiaq (Eskimo) name I was given at birth is most closely described using the English letters Ahngasuk.

Shop policies

Last updated on

Accepted payment methods

  • Visa
  • Mastercard
  • American Express
  • Discover
  • Apple Pay
  • Klarna
  • Sofort
  • Ideal
  • Paypal
  • GiftcardAccepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits