BeadsButtonsAndMore

Beads, Buttons and More

Fox Lake, Illinois · 118 Sales

BeadsButtonsAndMore

Beads, Buttons and More

Fox Lake, Illinois 118 Sales On Etsy since 2007

0 out of 5 stars
(49)

BeadsButtonsAndMore is taking a short break

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Note from shop owner I have to go on vacation mode for awhile. I hope to "see" you again soon.
Lee

Note from shop owner

Last updated on Sep 6, 2017

I have to go on vacation mode for awhile. I hope to "see" you again soon.
Lee

LeonardaAnn

Contact shop owner

LeonardaAnn

Reviews

No reviews in the last year
Tracy Stober

Tracy Stober on Dec 29, 2015

5 out of 5 stars

just as shown. Giving it to friend who's new year resolution is to organize her office and her bills.

jeanettemanzella

jeanettemanzella on Nov 1, 2015

5 out of 5 stars

Beautiful pen as described with great details. Such a talented artist. Excellent seller with fast shipping. Thank you.

View all 49 reviews

About

My life in polymer....

I answer to Lee, Leyan or Leonarda. My husband calls me "Beloved Darling” (actually it is more like “What now?”)

The portrait shown is a self-portrait that I drew in 2003. I did it on my computer with my mouse. It is part of a larger drawing that I did for my boss, showing how stressed I was. It included a stick figure body (which is totally inaccurate) and a pile of pulled out hair.

I have two Etsy shops. My main shop is called BEADS BUTTONS AND MORE. My other shop is call BEADS BUTTONS DICHROIC. It is supposed to be called BEADS BUTTONS AND DICHROIC but there weren't enough spaces to add "AND".... sigh.....

I have been working with polymer clay since 1998. I later branched out into silver clay and glass. I am pretty much self-taught. I use books, videos, DVDs, a few classes, and a lot of trial and error in the process.

When I first started out, I made a lot of beads and some buttons. At one point, a fellow artist suggested that I try making pens. They have become my biggest seller. I have since added key chains and letter openers, which also sell well. Basically I spend all my time on “AND MORE”. Some day, I hope to go back to the beginning, and start making beads and buttons again.

In any case, I try to make products that regular people can use, and I try to treat customers as I want to be treated. I have been buying mail order, since the time when one actually had to phone or (gasp!) mail in orders so I am pretty confident about what works well in selling online.

There are several polymer clay techniques I use a lot. One is texturing. I love textures. I have a large collection of different textures. I think it may border on the obsessive. I see texture everywhere. I have been at a doctor's office and, while he is performing some procedure, I realize that the instrument he is using would make a cool texture. I never mention it to the doctor, but it does cross my mind. I also love to shop at resale stores.

We went on vacation one year and I came back from the resale shops with bags of glass and other textured items. When I walked, I sounded like a clinking bag lady.

Another of my favorite techniques is Mokume Gane (pronounced ma-koo-may-gah-nay), which is the Japanese term that means “wood grained metal”. It is a technique that was developed by Denbei Shoami, a 17th century metal smith who used this technique in making samurai swords. In metalworking, different layers of metal are laminated together and then deformed to produce a design that looks somewhat like the grain of wood.

Mokume Gane, made with polymer clay, uses thin layers of clay, which are stacked and then distorted to create interesting patterns.

Probably the most popular technique in polymer clay is millefiori (also called caning), which is a glass making technique that dates back to ancient Rome and Alexandria. The term millefiori comes from the Italian words mille (thousand) and fiori (flower). The artist uses molten glass to form rods, which are bundled together to make patterns, which often resembled flowers. In the 1800s, millefiori was very popular for paperweights and glass trade beads.

A modern equivalent of millefiori is the slice and bake cookie. In any case, it is one of the most popular techniques for polymer clay (and frankly it is a lot easier to work with than molten glass, and a lot less fattening than baking cookies). With polymer clay, shapes of clay are combined to form canes, which can be reduced and altered to create various effects.

My Treasury concept
Even with a business as small as mine, I needed to define my “target customer”. After much thought, I realized that my target customers are people who are looking for gifts and one way to attract them it to find gift ideas for them. One cannot put any of one’s own items into a Treasury but, ideally, someone who is impressed by my Treasury selections will also check out my shops.

For the last several months, I have created “sets” of gift Treasuries for women. My plan with Treasuries is to create two “sets” each month. If you are looking for gifts, you can browse through my Treasuries and get some ideas that don’t look like you ran to Wal-Mart at the last minute.

Through my main shop (Beads Buttons and More), the Treasuries I create are in five price ranges (under $15, $15 to $25, $25 to $35, $35 to $50 and $50 and up.). The criteria I use:
• I have to like it
• I try to find things that are available now
• No custom items or personalized items (due to the time factor)
• No clothes that come in sizes, although sometimes I add house slippers
• I like rustic, colorful, vintage and patina’d items
• There are a lot of pictures, photos, tea cups, pottery, soaps and things like that.
• The tchotchkes (that sounds so much cooler than knick-knacks) that I pick out are generally small. This way if the recipient hates the gift, it is easier for them to stick in a drawer so they can pull it out when you visit.

Shop members

  • Lee, Leyan or Leonarda

    Owner

    I am a charming (slightly sarcastic) middle-aged matron living in northern Illinois. I have a husband, no pets and an extremely expensive craft habit. I am selling on Etsy to feed that habit.

  • Ed, Beloved or Pig

    Staff

    My dear sweet husband (Ed, Beloved or Pig) is my STAFF. He is smart, honest, trustworthy, crabby, opinionated, and a control freak but he does wonderful work, so he does have redeeming social value.

Shop policies

Last updated on February 6, 2011
I am a charming (slightly sarcastic) middle-aged matron living in northern Illinois. I have a husband, no pets and an extremely expensive craft habit. I am selling on Etsy to feed that habit. I answer to Lee, Leyan or Leonarda. My husband calls me “Beloved Darling” (actually it is more like “What now?”)

My business is called BEADS BUTTONS AND MORE. I have been working with polymer clay since 1998. I later branched out into silver clay and glass. I am pretty much self-taught. I use books, videos, DVDs, a few classes, and a lot of trial and error in the process.

When I first started out, I made a lot of beads and some buttons. At one point, a fellow artist suggested that I try making pens. They have become my biggest seller. I have since added key chains and letter openers, which also sell well. Basically I spend all my time on “AND MORE”. Some day, I hope to go back to the beginning, and start making beads and buttons again.

Please see my bio for my “backstory”. (That sounds so cool!)

In any case, I try to make products that regular people can use, and I try to treat customers as I want to be treated. I have been buying mail order, since the time when one actually had to phone or (gasp!) mail in orders so I am pretty confident about what works well in selling online. If you have any questions or issues with orders from me, please contact me so that we can work together for a resolution. If we can’t solve the problem, you can return the product and receive a refund.

Product information for my Twist, Click and Elite pens and Secret Compartment Key Chains:

Some items are covered with millefiori (also called canes). Millefiori is a glass making technique that dates back to ancient Rome and Alexandria.
The term millefiori comes from the Italian words mille (thousand) and fiori (flower).

The artist uses molten glass to form rods, which are bundled together to make patterns, which often resembled flowers. In the 1800s, millefiori was very popular for paperweights and glass trade beads.

A modern equivalent of millefiori is the slice and bake cookie. In any case, it is one of the most popular techniques for polymer clay (and frankly it is a lot easier to work with than molten glass, and a lot less fattening than baking cookies).

With polymer clay, shapes of clay are combined to form canes, which can be reduced and altered to create various effects.

Some items are covered with mokume gane. Mokume gane (pronounced ma-koo-may-gah-nay, is the Japanese term that means “wood grained metal”. It is a technique that was developed by Denbei Shoami, a 17th century metal smith who used this technique in making samurai swords. In metalworking, different layers of metal are laminated together and then deformed to produce a design that looks somewhat like the grain of wood. Mokume Gane made with polymer clay uses thin layers of clay, which are stacked and then distorted to create interesting patterns.

The products go through an involved production process. Once the item is covered, they are sanded (through various grits), dipped in polyurethane finish three times, rubbed with steel wool and then baked for extra durability.

Product information for my Classic pens:

The Classic pens are very basic. The actual pen is made by Paper Mate and uses standard refills. An interesting pattern develops with the clay or some surface technique evolves that just seems to be perfect to cover a pen. The pens are covered with polymer clay and usually textured or glittered to create the design. Sometimes, I use metal leaf or acrylic paint as a surface technique. The pens are dipped in three coats of acrylic finish and then baked for added durability.

Accepted payment methods

  • Accepts Etsy Gift Cards and Etsy Credits
  • Money Order
  • Check
  • Other Method
Returns and exchanges
Satisfaction is guaranteed. If you're not completely satisfied, please return your purchase within 60 days of receipt. Returns must be returned in original condition. Please keep the original packaging. I will refund 100% of the purchase price. Buyers are responsible for return shipping costs.
Payment
I accept PayPal, checks and money orders. I may wait until personal checks clear. If payment is not received within 10 days, the item will be re-listed. Illinois buyers must pay sales tax of 7%
Shipping
I usually can ship your item(s) within 7 days of receiving payment. I ship via USPS. I will ship to the shipping address provided on the Etsy order. If your addresses in Etsy and PayPal are different, please let me know which address to ship your order to. No international orders at this time.
Additional policies and FAQs
Once you have received your order and you are satisfied, please leave feedback in my shop. This way I will know that you have received the shipment.