dnuoFound

Found Treasures

Durham, Connecticut · 236 Sales

dnuoFound

Found Treasures

Durham, Connecticut 236 Sales On Etsy since 2016

5 out of 5 stars
(84)

Announcement   Welcome to dnuoFound Vintage, new items are added all the time, so favorite us here and follow on instagram @dnuofoundvintage to see our latest items!

Every purchase comes with a complimentary copy of Take Me Out, a zine about lifestyle waste reduction!

Are you an etsy seller too? I'm trade friendly, so message me if you're interested!

Announcement

Last updated on Jan 23, 2018

Welcome to dnuoFound Vintage, new items are added all the time, so favorite us here and follow on instagram @dnuofoundvintage to see our latest items!

Every purchase comes with a complimentary copy of Take Me Out, a zine about lifestyle waste reduction!

Are you an etsy seller too? I'm trade friendly, so message me if you're interested!

Aubree Keurajian

Contact shop owner

Aubree Keurajian

View all 234 items

About

Vintage clothing and upcycled creations for a sustainable world.

dnuoFound Vintage is about more than just selling clothing. It's about taking things out of the waste stream. A huge amount of clothing is thrown away every year, and I didn't want to be a part of that. Many items in my store have been mended; I have been sewing since childhood and even did a little mending on the side in college. My line of handmade items, Edits, are all made from clothing that is unwearable, whether from staining, wear, or other damage. Most of this clothing is vintage, although not all, and I always try to provide at least some of the new item's lineage.

FAQs:

What is your return policy?

Let me know within 14 days of receiving the item, and send it back to me within 30. It's Etsy policy that buyers are responsible for return shipping costs.

Why do you include a zine about waste with purchases?
Because we all need to be part of the solution. The garment industry is hugely wasteful in a myriad of ways. Although many factories are not required to disclose the amount of waste they produce, the amount of scrap fabric, waste chemicals, and other byproducts is undoubtedly high. But clothing’s trail of trash doesn’t end at the factory. The process of transporting products causes huge amounts of fossil fuel emissions, and then there’s packaging and items lost in transit. But even that’s not all, our idea of “fast fashion”, with styles changing more frequently than the seasons, means that the average American throws out 68 pounds of clothing and other fabric per year . Much of this material is either still wearable, or could be easily repurposed. Buying and wearing vintage clothes is one way to keep them out of the waste stream, but it’s just a small part of a much larger effort.

Where do you source your clothing?

I started dnuoFound when I got an amazing windfall of vintage clothing from my grandmother’s estate – this is where a lot of the awesome handmade items from the 1970s came from! Since then my inventory has grown from a number of sources. My parents’ home has been in my family since the early 1900s, and with two large barns there’s a lot of space that boxes of clothes have gotten lost in over the years and generations. Most of the items from the 1940s, and a lot of the fabric, come from my family home. Another major source are friends and family members looking to get rid of stuff, that’s where the awesome 80s skirts and shirts came from. I also get inventory from thrift stores, estate sales, and yard sales, although I’m trying to buy from thrift stores less.

As far as location – Connecticut, Long Island, and Indiana are the biggest contributors, in that order.

Do you do trades? Why?

I’m always interested in trading! Whether you sell on Etsy or another platform, send me a message and we’ll see what works!

I think trading is a great for a couple of reasons. When I trade I usually end up with something I really like, but wouldn’t have gone out of my way to get myself – like a new pair of knitted socks. Traders are usually also small businesses, in my experience often just a single person like me, and I love supporting people directly. Trading gives me the opportunity to support a small business owner like myself that I otherwise never would have. I also really like that trading is a non-money based economy; it does a little part to build up an alternative to our standard capitalist system.

What do you do to make your business more environmentally friendly?

The premise itself of my store is waste reduction, so being environmentally friendly is super important to me. But beyond that, I am always looking for ways to make my actual business operation less wasteful:

~ Every box I ship out is reused. (I’m looking for a way to be better about my mailing envelopes though, any suggestions?)
~ I save all paper waste that I produce and am in the process of turning it into my business cards.
~ I save all fabric scraps and thread from mending and making and use it as filling for stuffed things like cat toys.
~ I try to use the most environmentally friendly washing methods possible, including always line drying and washing cold, which I recommend for most kinds of laundry. (Do you make eco-friendly detergents and want to trade?)
~ Thanks to my parents, my workspace is primarily powered by solar panels on our home.

Shop members

  • Aubree Keurajian

    Owner, Curator, Maker

    An environmentalist by birth and scientist by education, I naturally became involved in waste reduction and somewhat less naturally with fashion. Born of circumstance, this store is my attempt at an environmentally friendly business model <3

Shop policies