dongoddard

Ceramics handmade in Montreal, Quebec

Montreal, Canada

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Announcement    *HOLIDAY SHIPPING* - Please place your Christmas orders as early as possible to avoid potential delays. I cannot be held responsible for orders not received by December 25th, as postal services are overwhelmed at the best of times and backlogs are possible. International shipping has been turned off due to very high postal rates and extreme delays. If you are outside of Canada or the U.S. and are interested in ordering, please contact me directly. Follow along at instagram.com/don_goddard

Announcement

Last updated on Nov 17, 2021

*HOLIDAY SHIPPING* - Please place your Christmas orders as early as possible to avoid potential delays. I cannot be held responsible for orders not received by December 25th, as postal services are overwhelmed at the best of times and backlogs are possible. International shipping has been turned off due to very high postal rates and extreme delays. If you are outside of Canada or the U.S. and are interested in ordering, please contact me directly. Follow along at instagram.com/don_goddard

Items

 
Don Goddard

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Don Goddard

Reviews

Average item review
5 out of 5 stars
(48)
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Quality 7 Shipping 8

About dongoddard

Sales 122
On Etsy since 2018

My work is made of high fired stoneware or porcelain; or more recently, low fired earthenware clay. They are all functional, one-of-a-kind pieces that can be used for food or drink, and are dishwasher safe. Details about the process and glazes used will be more specific in each listing.

Shop members

  • Don Goddard

    Owner, Maker

    Potter and artist from Montreal, Canada with over 40 years experience in ceramics.

  • Gwylan Goddard

    Photographer, Customer Service

    My daughter Gwylan photographs all of my work and basically runs the shop, managing my inventory.

Shop policies

More information

Last updated on Apr 3, 2021
Frequently asked questions
What is your inspiration?

All my work is inspired by traditional Japanese tea wares. I have focused on this type of work for the last 25 years. I strive to make tea ware and pots in general that are expressive, with strong, simple forms and surfaces that are layered with visual information. As there are so many variables in what I do, there are always surprises and disappointments. The kiln makes the last decision. Therefore, I don't necessarily have specific expectations about what the pot's going to be like. At its best, to me, pottery is simply a relationship with nature. My artist statement always includes "vitality through surface, strength through form, purpose through function".

What is your education?

I am largely a self-taught potter. I attended art school with some courses in clay but never studied ceramics formally. I came to love the Japanese attitude about nature, materials and process over the course of many years working with clay.

Where else can we see/purchase your work?

Larger pieces are viewed pretty much exclusively in Canada at galleries and seasonal ceramics shows. I do sell through a place called General Fine Craft, Art & Design in Almonte, Ontario. They may sometimes ship larger pieces, you could certainly enquire with them (link: http://generalfinecraft.com). Selling 'directly' through Etsy is really all I'm doing so far, and it's still new so that's why I'm beginning with mostly small tea ware pieces. 

What is the difference between low fired and high fired?

The term high fired generally refers to stoneware and porcelain clay bodies fired to about 1300 degrees Celsius. Low fired ceramics are usually made of an earthenware clay fired at a lower temperature of about 1000 degrees celcius. Decorative and functional waste are made in both ranges.

For how long have you been doing ceramics?

48 years.

Do you make your own glazes?

Yes. I currently use about 8 glazes regularly.

What is shino?

Shino is a simple glaze made from clay and feldspar. It was used by Japanese folk potters for domestic ware. In the 16th century it was revered by tea masters for its naturalistic and unassuming qualities.